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A Guide to Dolby Atmos in the Home

cezarL

Member
Now running 7.2.4 at last!
Set up the Dali Altecos as up-firing fronts and rears and, at least with the Dolby demo clips (haven't yet watched a movie in full), what can I say... it's pretty much awesome :)
Having 4 speakers for Atmos is a considerable improvement over just 2 in front (again, this just from testing with the demos).
I can't detect any overhead sound as coming from ear-level, guess I got lucky with the positioning of the speakers.
I don't really see a reason to test with on-wall placement, I think I'll just stick with them as up-firing... and a 50m roll of unused speaker cable :)

Odd thing is, Audyssey decided to up the levels of the rear ones way above the rest, I had to lower their individual levels by 2db each because the rear sound was overpowering.

I've all 4 with the cross-overs set to 80Hz (the AVR set them at 40) but I've seen a few comments here suggesting they should be set higher, at 120Hz.
Any benefit to be had in increasing the cross-over values?
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
I'd suggest increasing the crossovers associated with the upfiring speakers to no lower than 120Hz and maybe even having them at 150Hz? This is because the audio is being bounced off your ceiling and lower frequencies don't reflect well if at all. You are effectively losing the lower frequencies being sent to the channels associated with the upfiring speakers and would be better off portraying them via the sub.
 

cezarL

Member
I see, thanks for the tip and explanation.
The LFE limit for subs on the Denon is set to 120, I'll increase the crossovers for the up-firers to that value.
 

gibbsy

Moderator
I see, thanks for the tip and explanation.
The LFE limit for subs on the Denon is set to 120, I'll increase the crossovers for the up-firers to that value.
I have KEF R50s set to 120hz. I also have the levels +2dB over Audyssey.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
The LFE limit for subs on the Denon is set to 120, I'll increase the crossovers for the up-firers to that value.

The LPF of LFE filter only applies to the LFE channel if and when present. This filter has no effect upon the ctossovers or the frequencies being redirected to the subwoofer in association with them.

There is no limit upon the frequencies that can be redirected to the sub other than the crossover setting limit itself. This would be 200Hz.

By the way, the reason you'd leave the LPF of LFE filter set to 120Hz is because this is the ceiling for the LFE channel in assciation with Dolby encoded soundtracks.
 

Coulson

Well-known Member
I'd suggest increasing the crossovers associated with the upfiring speakers to no lower than 120Hz and maybe even having them at 150Hz? This is because the audio is being bounced off your ceiling and lower frequencies don't reflect well if at all. You are effectively losing the lower frequencies being sent to the channels associated with the upfiring speakers and would be better off portraying them via the sub.
It really depends on your speakers and maybe ceiling type/height too. Mine seem to be effective around 110Hz.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
No, it depends upon the fact that lower frequencies don't reflect off of surfaces and are ordinarilly absorbed by them. The speakers being used makes no difference what so ever.
 

Coulson

Well-known Member
No, it depends upon the fact that lower frequencies don't reflect off of surfaces and are ordinarilly absorbed by them. The speakers being used makes no difference what so ever.
So what does that mean for my situation?
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
It would be the same for anyone ising upward firing speakers. Set the crossover associated with the upward firing speakers to a frequency in the range of 120 to 200Hz.

It isn't as though the frequencies being redirected to the sub will have been localised anyway although they may be more locatable than frequencies closer to 80Hz. I'd not expect the sub's location to become apparent if portraying frequencies in the range 120 to 150Hz.
 
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Coulson

Well-known Member
It would be the same for anyone ising upward firing speakers. Set the crossover associated with the upward firing speakers to a frequency in the range of 120 to 200Hz.

It isn't as though the frequencies being redirected to the sub will have been localised anyway although they may be more locatable than frequencies closer to 80Hz. I'd not expect the sub's location to become apparent if portraying frequencies in the range 120 to 150Hz.
Audyssey put it at 110 and that's what I found worked for me even before Audyssey. Anyway, I will try that and see if it makes a difference.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
All that happens when using the receiver's calibration to determine where it sets the crossover is the AV receiver measures the roll off for the respective speakers. It is this roll off that determines where the receiver suggests a crossover be set or what size the speakers are. Audyssey don't actually deal with bass management and it is left to the manufacturers to deal with this. The only thing Audyssey do is measure the roll off, they don't determine seaker sizes or set crossovers.

This in turn wouldn't take into consideration other factors that influence where you ideally set a crossover. The main one in this instance being the fact that the lower frequencies are not rebounded off your ceiling. If the lower end frequencies are not being reflected then it they are either lost by being absorbed into the building or that they are remaining fixed to where the speakers themselves are located.

By the way, Audyssey suggest bass management be dealt with manually post calibration. Audyssey suggest all speakers be set as being SMALL irrespective of their physical size, their rated abilities or what the calibration come up with.

The only thing worth noting about the crossover settings an AV receiver arrives at after running its calibration is that you should avoid manually setting crossovers below this. Doing so would result in you trying to potray frequencies below the measured roll off abilities of the speakers in question. There isn't anything preventing somone using a higher setting though and you are free to manually set crossover to a higher setting without any detrimental effect.
 
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gibbsy

Moderator
Audyssey put it at 110 and that's what I found worked for me even before Audyssey. Anyway, I will try that and see if it makes a difference.
Audyssey rolled off my KEF R50s at 100hz, still set them to 120 though.
 

Coulson

Well-known Member
All that happens when using the receiver's calibration to determine where it sets the crossover is the AV receiver measures the roll off for the respective speakers. It is this roll off that determines where the receiver suggests a crossover be set or what size the speakers are. Audyssey don't actually deal with bass management and it is left to the manufacturers to deal with this. The only thing Audyssey do is measure the roll off, they don't determine seaker sizes or set crossovers.

This in turn wouldn't take into consideration other factors that influence where you ideally set a crossover. The main one in this instance being the fact that the lower frequencies are not rebounded off your ceiling. If the lower end frequencies are not being reflected then it they are either lost by being absorbed into the building or that they are remaining fixed to where the speakers themselves are located.

By the way, Audyssey suggest bass management be dealt with manually post calibration. Audyssey suggest all speakers be set as being SMALL irrespective of their physical size, their rated abilities or what the calibration come up with.

The only thing worth noting about the crossover settings an AV receiver arrives at adter running its calibration is that you should avoid manually setting crossovers below this. Doing so would result in you trying to potray frequencies below the measured roll off abilities of the speakers in question.
Yeah all what you said is a given. I just hadn't bothered to set my up firing speakers above 110hz. I've set them to 150hz now and (depending on the type of effect) the height effects now seem to have more weight. I may experiment more but at the moment I like this :)

Thanks.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
The only time you'd need to set the crossover back to a lower setting is if you start detecting where you sub is located. If sending higher frequencies above 80Hz to a sub then the chances of this becoming a potential issue increase, but it is very rare that such issues arise.
 

Coulson

Well-known Member
The only time you'd need to set the crossover back to a lower setting is if you start detecting where you sub is located. If sending higher frequencies above 80Hz to a sub then the chances of this becoming a potential issue increase, but it is very rare that such issues arise.
Thanks. I've been saying this for a while now, but every time I think I've got the best out of my system another tweak makes it better. I've tried a couple more film clips and setting to 150Hz definitely makes a difference.

What's funny is that if I get the time, I will watch many films again and enjoy them even more.

Thanks again :)
 

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