Amazon delivered wrong tv

sentinel999

Standard Member
Hi everyone, just wondering if anyone could offer any advice. I ordered a £1500 55 inch TV through a third party retailer on the Amazon website. However, the company actually sent me a 50 inch TV, which is worth around £700 less, according to my research. I wasn't aware of this until I unpacked it after the delivery driver left. (The box was in a shoddy, state however and had been repackaged - should have known....) The company is refusing to acknowledge their error as the information on the box corresponds to the more expensive TV (the one I DIDN'T receive). I provided the serial number of the wrong TV I received but they claim they have never stocked this specific TV (although having checked their Amazon account, they DO stock that model). I am going to raise an A to Z claim through Amazon, but am a very nervous about losing a hefty chunk of money if my claim fails. Has anyone had similar experiences with Amazon or can offer advice as how to proceed ? Have taken pictures of the TV I received, box, etc., but nor sure what else I can provide as proof of the error.
 

961

Well-known Member
Amazon are usually pretty good with this sort of thing. I'd complain to them direct and without delay
If you paid by credit card or Visa debit card you should also complain to them under s75 of the consumer credit act (credit card) or under the Visa chargeback scheme (Visa Debit card)
If the tv has only recently arrived you may be able to reject the item under distance selling regulations, but you will have a very limited time to do this (usually 7 days from day after goods arrived) Take advice urgently from citizen's advice or consider this web site

Internet, mail order and telephone shopping : Directgov - Government, citizens and rights
 

dr no

Moderator
Amazon are the best for online customer service.
This is the reason why I always try to shop from there first.
At least you have that on your side.
If you cannot resolve it with the seller then get Amazon involved.
Sorry for your bad luck though. Must be gutting :(
 

MJG1985

Active Member
Make sure you do all communication with the seller via the proper channels listed on the Amazon website, not phone or direct email.
Amazon record all correspondence and you may need their help.

Regards, Mark
 

The Dark Horse

Well-known Member
Nightmare, sounds like a dodgy delivery driver or firm, probably fancied the TV himself and swapped his old TV for your new one. As others have said contact Amazon / credit card company asap. It always seems a grey area to me, the general advice is you should check everything before you sign for it, in the real world that never happens.

I really don't know where you would stand by signing for it because they could argue you are trying to swap your old TV and pretending you never got the new one. Be interested to hear how you get on.
 

AndyCob

Well-known Member
It's worth pointing out based on your post the thread title is wrong. Amazon didn't deliver the wrong TV a third party selling through their site did. If it was Amazon then I'm sure you would have no problems at all just report the wrong item organise the return etc. However with a third party seller Amazon don't take the same level (or any level? I'm not sure of the T&Cs for third party sellers) of responsibility. They will help I expect with contact and they will note a report against the seller but I don't think they will actively step in beyond removing a rogue seller if they have had lots of reports against them.

Obvious question is did you pay with a credit card in which case you should be covered I think and can raise it with them to get your money back, it's worth letting them know whats happened immediately and see what they say, they may even be able to get your money back instantly.

My concern would be where you stand if as you point out the retailer doesn't acknowledge the wrong item and is in effect implying you are pulling something, i.e. have kept the right item and are substituting the wrong one. Might be worth some contact with the CAB or Which for some advice.
 

Greg Hook

Moderator & Reviewer
Amazon will hopefully sort you out here. Whilst it is a third party seller, it is via the Amazon site and you are paying Amazon who then pass the money on.

If that fails the Credit Card company will protect you here.
 

sentinel999

Standard Member
Hi again,

thanks for all your replies. I've passed the issue onto Amazon directly so hopefully they can carry more weight than I can with the seller. I'm sure people try switching TVs so I can see why the seller is suspicious and thinks I have pulled a fast one. However, have bought several expensive electronic items from Amazon in the past and never claimed I received the wrong item. I am hoping this will count in my favor as the claim is investigated.

Andy, I think the A to Z guarantee suggests that buyers have the same level of protection from third party sellers as they would from buying from Amazon directly.

(http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/help/customer/display.html?nodeId=3149571)

This is fairly reassuring so am hoping I can get the item replaced or refunded by Amazon and they can claim the funds back from the seller directly. Will let you know what happens when I hear back from them.
 

vipergrm

Well-known Member
Very sorry to hear that. Sounds like a total nightmare. Fingers crossed Amazon sort it out because they are usually brilliant. It's possible the reseller probably doesn't know about this but it is going to be next to impossible to track what happened. Someone somewhere for sure knows the answer but very unlikely to happen...
 

961

Well-known Member
The retailer should be able to establish if the tv you received has ever been through its hands from the serial number
 

The Dark Horse

Well-known Member
The only stumbling block is if the third party seller did sell you the correct TV but a dodgy delivery driver swapped it for a cheap alternative afterwards. The third party sellers inventory would be correct and they would also have your signature as proof of delivery. How you can prove it was swapped after it left their premises is pretty much impossible.

Hopefully that's not what happened. Sounds like a nightmare, good luck !!
 

961

Well-known Member
The only stumbling block is if the third party seller did sell you the correct TV but a dodgy delivery driver swapped it for a cheap alternative afterwards. The third party sellers inventory would be correct and they would also have your signature as proof of delivery. How you can prove it was swapped after it left their premises is pretty much impossible.

Hopefully that's not what happened. Sounds like a nightmare, good luck !!
I think Amazon and the credit card co's are well used to sorting out this sort of dilemma
 

The Dark Horse

Well-known Member
I think Amazon and the credit card co's are well used to sorting out this sort of dilemma
Its a hard one to sort though if a dodgy courier is at fault. If the correct item leaves the depot and someone swaps it at the last moment, and it gets signed for, its very difficult to prove you didn't actually receive the correct item in the first place. You would hope Amazon have had similar claims from other customers who have used the same delivery company (not sure they all use the same couriers?) as that wold add weight to the argument.

Otherwise its your word against theirs. If your a regular customer they might do something as a good will gesture, and maybe the distance selling regulation might kick in?
 
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961

Well-known Member
Its a hard one to sort though if a dodgy courier is at fault. If the correct item leaves the depot and someone swaps it at the last moment, and it gets signed for, its very difficult to prove you didn't actually receive the correct item in the first place. You would hope Amazon have had similar claims from other customers who have used the same delivery company (not sure they all use the same couriers?) as that wold add weight to the argument.

Otherwise its your word against theirs. If your a regular customer they might do something as a good will gesture, and maybe the distance selling regulation might kick in?
My first inclination would have been to reject under the distance selling regulations, but that time may have passed

If that is the case I'd go very politely apesh*t with Amazon and the card company. Customers are by and large honest and these folk will soon establish what has happened

They will be able to establish the history of this tv from the serial number. How old, who sold it and usually who to

I've had the occasional trouble with Amazon suppliers. I've never found Amazon anything less than totally brilliant in sorting the thing out
 

vipergrm

Well-known Member
You may even have to get the Police involved too...
 

davieg1

Active Member
And that means???????????

It's pretty obvious what that means is it, previous posters have inferred that it could be a case that original tv left depot and been swapped over with a different tv by driver.All info giving by poster points to this, and as this is theft, then the police should be notified.
 
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logiciel

Moderator
I agree - but AVF Rule 1 please. Logiciel
 

fiddiwebb

Standard Member
It's pretty obvious what that means is it, previous posters have inferred that it could be a case that original tv left depot and been swapped over with a different tv by driver.All info giving by poster points to this, and as this is theft, then the police should be notified.
I think you will find it is only one poster here who has posted 3 times now saying it could be a dodgy delivery driver, not sure if that particular poster has had a bad previous experience with dodgy delivery drivers or not but it is more likely that the fault is with the seller either through a mistake or by design.
 

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