Electrician question

Hi all,

In the process of redecorating our kitchen and currently have this light under the cupboards which is turned on via a wall switch.

Can anyone advise if it's possible what I am wanting and if so what do I need to make it happen?

I'd like to remove the current light and run some white leds along the cupboards which I can turn on/off using the existing light switch rather than having to plug the led strip lights into a plug socket.

Thanks
 

Attachments

noiseboy72

Distinguished Member
Yes, it can be done. Usual method is to fit a fused spur to connect to the LED power supply and run wiring from there to the LEDs. If you have space in the cupboard, that can be used or we used a void at the end of the run of units where we could hide the power supply.
 
Yes, it can be done. Usual method is to fit a fused spur to connect to the LED power supply and run wiring from there to the LEDs. If you have space in the cupboard, that can be used or we used a void at the end of the run of units where we could hide the power supply.
Hi, so in simply terms what does that mean.....

Buy a fused spur socket as attached.... Buy my led strip lights? Cut the plug off the end? Wire the existing light into the fused spur along with wiring the led into the spur? Spur stays on all the time and light switch controls on/off?
 

Attachments

noiseboy72

Distinguished Member
Yes! Just make sure you buy LEDs with a power supply with a flying lead. Some are just a wall wart power adapter and ideally you don't want to fit a socket.

Make sure you fit a 3a fuse in the spur instead of the 13a that will probably be supplied.
 

ufo550

Well-known Member
Why complicate things. Alter the exist feed that supplies your existing light, put that into a single socket outlet (if your led strip comes supplied with plug). I usually place that part of the assembly on top of the wall units, so it’s out of sight. Usually the ‘kit’ comes sufficient lengths of flex to feed the lights underneath the wall units.

But the premise is, put a socket outlet on the end of your existing feed to light. As long as the existing install has been correctly installed, the switch will then carry on doing what’s it’s been doing. If the socket, can’t be placed on top of wall units, a label could be attached to the socket explaining its intended use, for future owners.

Please ensure you practise safe isolation, and only carry out the work if you are competent to do so.
 
Why complicate things. Alter the exist feed that supplies your existing light, put that into a single socket outlet (if your led strip comes supplied with plug). I usually place that part of the assembly on top of the wall units, so it’s out of sight. Usually the ‘kit’ comes sufficient lengths of flex to feed the lights underneath the wall units.

But the premise is, put a socket outlet on the end of your existing feed to light. As long as the existing install has been correctly installed, the switch will then carry on doing what’s it’s been doing. If the socket, can’t be placed on top of wall units, a label could be attached to the socket explaining its intended use, for future owners.

Please ensure you practise safe isolation, and only carry out the work if you are competent to do so.
So are you suggesting buying something like the attached? Wiring the existing light into this socket and then plugging the led lights into this socket? Leaving the switch on the wall to do the work? Hiding the socket etc.

I always carry out any work with mains turned off and am competent in carrying out things like this
 

Attachments

noiseboy72

Distinguished Member
Personally I've never liked fitting 13A sockets for lighting, as you can never be sure if the cabling and fittings up stream are going to be suitable without investigation. It's likely the switch itself is only rated at 5A and even if a 6A MCB is fitted, that will pass 10-15A for a significant period - certainly long enough for someone to plug in an iron and to have damaged the switch!

A fused spur prevents this sort of accident, but hiding or labelling the socket is potentially the next best thing.
 

ufo550

Well-known Member
Can’t see how a FCU will alter things, it can have the same 13A BS1362 fuse in it as the plug could have, so the FCU could be reused for something else in the same circumstances. In the socket installation it’s simpler for the OP.

As far as I’m aware, most modern plate switches are rated at 10A, but there is only a small likelihood of that being exceeded here. 1mm cable is rated at anything between 8A - 16A, dependant on installation method, so again likelihood of damage limited, with a 6A mcb for example.

@J3OEF I’m assuming you LED comes supplied with a plug? What do the manufacturers instructions advise?
 
Can’t see how a FCU will alter things, it can have the same 13A BS1362 fuse in it as the plug could have, so the FCU could be reused for something else in the same circumstances. In the socket installation it’s simpler for the OP.

As far as I’m aware, most modern plate switches are rated at 10A, but there is only a small likelihood of that being exceeded here. 1mm cable is rated at anything between 8A - 16A, dependant on installation method, so again likelihood of damage limited, with a 6A mcb for example.

@J3OEF I’m assuming you LED comes supplied with a plug? What do the manufacturers instructions advise?
Hi, not looked into it properly yet, was seeing if it was at all possible before I explored my options. But I would be looking at something like the below,

LE Daylight White LED Strip Lights 10M, 2400lm Bright Lightstrip for Home Cinema, Kitchen Cabinet, Bedroom or More, Pack of 2 x 5 Metre (12V Power Supply Required) https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00WQFP3AO/ref=cm_sw_r_tw_apa_i_R621EbXBPZVWT
 

John7

Well-known Member
I think we need to see a bit more of the existing wiring before we can assist with connections etc. All we can see in the photo is a small fluorescent light.

Does the existing wiring to that light come out of the wall near it, or is the wire going into the bottom of the cupboard, running through it and exiting above?
 

ufo550

Well-known Member
I tended to buy my led strips from a U.K. supplier; kits would made to bespoke lengths, controllers and power supplies, without an attacked plug. They also supplied aluminium profiles for the tape, I wouldn’t rely on the 3M sticky back, especially in an existing kitchen. Unfortunately I can’t recall the name of the company I used, but there’s quite a few out there.
 
Sorry for such a delay, i've been busy doing the decorating. Anyway I've managed to take a picture of exsisitng fitting and wiring so hopefully this can help get a more accurate answer as to how it can be done.
 

Attachments

ufo550

Well-known Member
You would need to terminate the supply cable in a suitable joint box. The problem you have with led strip, is you will have a bulky driver and possibly a controller to mount somewhere, which is a bit difficult underneath a wall unit. Although you can get some 240V led strip (which I've never used/installed).

Do you know where the other end of that cable goes? Is it visible on top of your wall units?
 
Last edited:
You would need to terminate the supply cable in a suitable joint box. The problem you have with led strip, is you will have a bulky driver and possibly a controller to mount somewhere, which is a bit difficult underneath a wall unit. Although you can get some 240V led strip.

Do you know where the other end of that cable goes? Is it visible on top of your wall units?
Nothing visible on top of the units, the cable goes into the tiles and I'd imagine passes past a socket and goes to the light switch which is on the wall as you enter the kitchen. I could potentially mount the driver/controller in the cupboard above by drilling up and feeding wires through?
 

ufo550

Well-known Member
Nothing visible on top of the units, the cable goes into the tiles and I'd imagine passes past a socket and goes to the light switch which is on the wall as you enter the kitchen. I could potentially mount the driver/controller in the cupboard above by drilling up and feeding wires through?
I always tended to mount them out of the way above (on top) of the wall units. You might need to do some investigative work, to see where that cable runs. I wouldn't like to put those items in the back of a cupboard, if that's what you are suggesting?
 
I always tended to mount them out of the way above (on top) of the wall units. You might need to do some investigative work, to see where that cable runs. I wouldn't like to put those items in the back of a cupboard, if that's what you are suggesting?
That's what I was suggesting yes. I assume that's bad practice?

Other then taking tiles off how would I investigate such a thing?

Video below of location and switch

 
I’d have to think about, off to cook the tea now :) It would also depend on what sort of led strip you’re going to use. Perhaps find a product and perhaps we could help.
Something like this possibly?

XUNATA 5m LED Strip AC 220V 240V IP67 Waterproof 3014 SMD 120LEDs/m Commercial Rope Light Plug Cold White Ribbon, DIY Kitchen Car Bar Indoor Decor UK Fast Shipping
 

ufo550

Well-known Member
You can remove the plug and use a Click CT102C , make sure you use the female side for the supply cable. As per your suggestion, & get the lighting cable above the bottom of the wall unit. I would recommend installing some sort of removable barrier to protect & contain the cabling etc. Like a piece of melamine board to match the internal of your wall units.

I can't see any BS or CE markings on it and seems to have a few bad reviews.
 
You can remove the plug and use a Click CT102C , make sure you use the female side for the supply cable. As per your suggestion, & get the lighting cable above the bottom of the wall unit. I would recommend installing some sort of removable barrier to protect & contain the cabling etc. Like a piece of melamine board to match the internal of your wall units.

I can't see any BS or CE markings on it and seems to have a few bad reviews.
Hey pal,

What about soenthing like this then?





Thanks
 
That has a CE mark, but can it be cut to suit your needs?
This was my next question, the units I want to put them under are split, example.... I have one length or around 2.5 meters then I have the cooker and hood and then the next unit so how would you navigate this? Would I need two lengths of cable and then need to route the cables over into the same box?
 

ufo550

Well-known Member
Using this system, you would need separate 230V supplies, which goes beyond simple DIY skills. More expensive kits, can be fed via extra low voltage cables, which is more suited to DIY skills. But then you have the problem of locating the drives etc, and installing the cables between gaps in your wall units.

Perhaps you should consult with an electrician, to carry out your works.
 
Think your right, it's probably easier to do just that. I'll find someone and get them to do it for my. Whilst I'm here though, how would I go about moving this lighting fitting? It's in middle of the room but we want it over the table.... Needs moving down around 60cm.......is it as easy as making a new hole.... Buying a click box you linked me to previously and then buying some new wiring? Existing wiring going into box.... New wiring going into box and then into light fitting? Pic attached
 

Attachments

Similar threads

The latest video from AVForums

LG CX 4K OLED TV Review: The best TV of 2020?

Trending threads

Latest News

Philips online events to replace IFA 2020 attendance
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Marantz announces 8K ready SR series AV Receivers
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Ennio Morricone: Legendary film composer dies aged 91
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
AVForums Podcast: 5th July 2020
  • By Phil Hinton
  • Published
Sky comedy panel shows back to film new series
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Top Bottom