Epson launches LS10500 Laser Projector at CEDIA 2016

indus

Distinguished Member
The pro version being able to play all aspect ratios without anamorphic lens is interesting!

Does that mean that if you have a 16:9 screen and watch a scope film the Epson will fill the whole screen?

Will this be a first for a PJ? Or have I misunderstood?
 

Peter Parker

Distinguished Member
All projectors with a zoom greater than 1.33 (and a lens shift) can show scope on a 2.35 screen - just zoom the image from 16:9 to scope and keep the image height the same.

All the Epson is doing is zooming with a lens memory.
 

KelvinS1965

Distinguished Member
Does that mean that if you have a 16:9 screen and watch a scope film the Epson will fill the whole screen?
No, as Gary says it's just zooming like any other projector with a decent zoom range can do, only it can be done automatically.

Even if it could 'fill a 16:9 screen watching scope' it would have to crop the sides or otherwise distort the image to fit.
 

indus

Distinguished Member
Thanks, I thought it sounded too good to be true lol
 

geogan

Well-known Member
"The Pro Cinema LS10500 projects 2.40, 2.35, 1.85, and 1.78 aspect ratios on the same screen, without an anamorphic lens, and no downtime switching between aspect ratios."

Is see above comments in thread but the way they phrase this phrase is confusing.

If it just means it zooms out to change from a smaller 1.78:1 on a scope screen to the full width of the scope screen in 2.40:1 then what do they mean by "no downtime"?

Sounds like some sort of "instant" flick between different aspect ratios somehow? Could it be some sort of digital zoom / scalar like the way a Lumagen does? (ie. it's always in 2.40:1 full scope and just displays 1.78:1 or other aspects in a small scaled version in the middle of it instantly without any lens movement).

That only works if panels have more resolution than video resolution really though.
 

Peter Parker

Distinguished Member
Maybe 'no downtime' means when you press the lens memory function, it just does the zooming for you and you see the image the whole time. No lens to move in or out of the light path and obstruct the image.
 

geogan

Well-known Member
I suspect it means if you have 2.40:1 screen it does instantaneous scaling with pillarboxing at sides to make the rest fit in a constant height image.
Yeah, that's what I thought it meant (what i was trying to describe above). But of course that means that since the 2.40:1 1080P video only has a vertical resolution of about 810 pixels (as the other 270 pixels are just black top/bottom) then you would be viewing all other aspects scaled down to 810 vertical pixels.

I used to do this exact trick with movies on my HTPC server as I used to have the PJ always zoomed to fill 2.40:1 screen and the trick was to then set the Windows 7 screen resolution to a custom 1920 x 810 pixels so then nothing overflowed the height and Windows Media player would (in zoom mode) play all my movies regardless of aspect in constant height on the 240:1 screen. I stopped doing this as I didn't want to watch all the newer 1.78:1 movies at the lower 810 scaled resolution any more. I mean the scaling was not bad, you wouldn't really notice it, but it would just be in the back of your mind.

Actually I think that is the exact setup you can see in my signature image (Frame of Frozen Bluray rip from HTPC on 2.40:1 screen)

That's why I said this trick is best if your panel resolution is more than the video. i.e. I could do this using a 4K Windows resolution on a 4K projector displaying 1080P material and not lose any source (movie) resolution - but then if you had that setup, you'd probably want 4K source material instead!
 

Peter Parker

Distinguished Member
I did something similar with HTPC and an A lens - always using the full res height. With SD material, using the full height and scaling the width to 16:9 meant no loss of resolution. With HD I would only lose res on 16:9 content unless I removed the lens and zoomed the image smaller.
 

dhts

Active Member
They had the exact same description in the LS10000 brochure:

""Project 2.40, 2.35, 1.85 and 1.78 aspect ratios on the same screen without an anamorphic lens — and no downtime when switching between ratios."

So nothing new I'd say...
 

HAWK-EYE

Well-known Member
It`s like pulling teeth for Epson to explain in detail the differences so far

HDR + video processor has been redone?
 

geogan

Well-known Member
They had the exact same description in the LS10000 brochure:

""Project 2.40, 2.35, 1.85 and 1.78 aspect ratios on the same screen without an anamorphic lens — and no downtime when switching between ratios."

So nothing new I'd say...
So did that one have some sort of constant height scaling system in it then?
 

Steve Withers

Reviewer
I'm pretty sure is exactly the same projector as previously but with HDR 10 support added and new HDMI 2.0a inputs. It will be identical to the new TW9300 but with a laser light source rather than a bulb. Not that that's a bad thing, the LS10000 was a great projector.
 

HAWK-EYE

Well-known Member
I'm pretty sure is exactly the same projector as previously but with HDR 10 support added and new HDMI 2.0a inputs. It will be identical to the new TW9300 but with a laser light source rather than a bulb. Not that that's a bad thing, the LS10000 was a great projector.
So Epson is using the new quality lens developed for the TW9300 in the new LS10500?
 

Peter Parker

Distinguished Member
If you can get WCG to the LS10000 (and I think Ricky has had some success there), and I think just send a UHD signal with 4:2:0, 24fps and no HDR you'll be good for a few years and not be missing too much IMHO. It produces a great image.
 

True Romance

Distinguished Member
If you can get WCG to the LS10000 (and I think Ricky has had some success there), and I think just send a UHD signal with 4:2:0, 24fps and no HDR you'll be good for a few years and not be missing too much IMHO. It produces a great image.
Which just what I've done this week :smashin:
 

Peter Parker

Distinguished Member
Do you know what percentage of P3 the LS10000 can do? If that means the image is on a par with the likes of JVC, and the prices drop due to the new model, that would be an absolute bargain.

Other than HDR, are there any other differences between UHD with what you have and something like the new lamp based Epsons?
 

Nodular

Well-known Member

Nodular

Well-known Member

bandyka

Well-known Member
If you can get WCG to the LS10000 (and I think Ricky has had some success there), and I think just send a UHD signal with 4:2:0, 24fps and no HDR you'll be good for a few years and not be missing too much IMHO. It produces a great image.
Agree except a lot of peeps including were hoping for 18Gps and HDR 60Hz so we can play games on this as well and use Desktop environment in its full 4:4:4 10bit glory, this PJ would be perfect for that sort use use given the laser engine.
 

Peter Parker

Distinguished Member
I guess I just look a things from a movie watching perspective and don't think of gaming on a pj. I just use a monitor for that.
 

bandyka

Well-known Member
Fair enough but lots of us do and high end htpc are now very common.
 

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