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My best value TVs, 2019-2020 Edition

Dodgexander

Moderator
My best value TVs, 2019-2020 Edition
So here we are again. Its that time of year.

The first time it usually becomes viable to purchase a newly released model!

Please read this post before posting and asking for advice. Include all the information we need to recommend you the right TV!

  1. Before choosing a TV you must understand which panel type you want from a TV, all have their pros and cons here.
  2. The second most important decision to make when purchasing a TV is how important it is a TV handles HDR content, both to a high standard and without issues. The difference between a more expensive LCD TV and a cheaper one now is almost exclusively with HDR hardware, with budget models able to display SDR to a good standard. It is not like it used to be where the more you spend, the better overall picture quality you get..please read here: All about HDR (High Dynamic Range)
  3. The third is how much importance you place on motion. Not just how the TV copes with motion out of the box, but how important it is to you to be able to tweak and improve motion.
This thread is compiled using model numbers and prices from the UK market, if you are from the EU, North America or the Rest of the World model numbers, value and pricing may differ. Please see here for model numbering differences in different regions.

IMPORTANT!!
Please remember that an upgrade won't always be an upgrade and in many cases getting a new UHD model can mean for worse picture quality than your current TV (sometimes compared to models as much as 10 year old). Do not automatically assume that a new TV will be better than your current one and do not assume that gaming at UHD will automatically be better than FHD, there are complications and drawbacks to using an UHD model which must be understood before purchasing!
See: Should I upgrade? - UHD vs FHD

Gamers detailed Q&A here.

Comparison of all OLED models here.


Last years guide: My best value TVs, 2018-2019 Edition

Notice any errors, both in recommendations or formatting? Let me know.
Notice a price drop? Let me know.

Value is based on prices available for everyone, employee discount or B2B/Club retailer pricing like Costco are not included. *Current;y there's a 25% off promotion for students and NHS workers with Samsung, so that pushes the value for money up significantly on Samsung models, particularly if you are buying higher end.
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Jump to OP
Jump to 24-32"
Jump to 40-43"
Jump to 49-50"
Jump to 55"
Jump to 65"
Jump to 75/77"
Jump to 82"+
Jump to special mentions/reasoning
Jump to FAQ
Jump to latest post
 
Last edited:

Dodgexander

Moderator
55" Value per screen size rating: Excellent

The most commonly purchased TV size and the first size where manufacturers offer high end TVs. Choose this size to get better value for money, more choice and better specifications than smaller models.

Beware also that for most people, 55" is really going to be on the small side to make the most of UHD content. For UHD to look better, look at larger TV sizes or view very close up to the screen.

Low range models, up to and around £450
Don't knock TVs at this price range. They are good enough for most people and especially suited for those wanting the best picture quality for non-HDR content such as regular TV, FHD Blu-Rays and the non HDR games consoles. If you are a basic user with a limited budget and you don't need all the bells or whistles these TVs are 90% as good as the higher end ones with most content.
  1. Hisense 55B7500 - Currently worth the extra over the B7100 due to a small price difference and the addition of Dolby Vision HDR support.
  1. LG 55UM7400 - Great smart TV, competitive pricing compared to the competition.
Lower Mid range models up to £700
Most people don't need TVs this good, overall they build on TVs above with better connectivity, superior anti reflection filters. 120hz panels are most common at this price also which means these are the first TVs that allow better control of motion using both motion interpolation and dark frame insertion. Picture processing is generally improved a little compared to cheaper TVs so you can expect slightly better upscaling.
  1. Hisense 55U8B - The king of the mid range, slightly brighter than budget models, 120hz panel for better motion, rudimentary local dimming and Dolby Vision HDR support. Its a step up with HDR from cheaper models.
  2. Samsung 55RU8000 - The next best option, gamers may prefer this TV compared to the Hisense as it includes HDMI 2.1 features: Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) and Auto Low Latency Mode(ALLM). It however comes with very poor dimming and low peak brightness for a mid range model, with no Dolby Vision HDR support. That makes it pretty poor on the HDR front.
  1. Philips 55PUS8303 (or if you want good built in sound, the 55PUS8804) - Good motion processing, poor smart TV. HDMI v2.1 Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) included for gamers. The higher end model comes with B and W speakers, and is the only way to get a mid range TV with decent integrated sound. It also comes with Dolby Vision and HDR10+ format support.
  2. LG 55SM8500/55SM8600 - If you can stretch to this you get mid range specs at low prices. The SM8600 is another Currys exclusive of the same TV. Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) included for gamers. Dolby Vision HDR support.
Upper Mid range models up to £1000
There's been a fantastic price cut this year putting capable HDR LCDs at affordable prices, hopefully a sign of things to come. These TVs are the first TVs in the list that can display HDR to a good standard and without issues.
  1. Sony 55XF9005 - Its not a 2019 model but its still being produced in 2019. Offers superior motion processing, picture accuracy and dolby vision HDR support compared to the Samsung Q70R but has worse smart TV and HDMI connectivity.
  2. Samsung 55Q70R - Samsung are back this year with a best buy! This is the gamer choice due to several Samsung exclusive gaming features. You can use motion interpolation and dark frame insertion without adding input lag. There's HDMI 2.1 Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) support for Xbox/AMD PC graphics cards and Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) is included which is another boost for gamers. Its smart TV platform is also very good. Downside is poorer motion processing, poor picture accuracy in HDR mode and lack of Dolby Vision HDR support. It does however include support for HDR10+.
  3. Sony 55XG9505 - Its recent price reduction puts it top of the list. Very good motion and HDR performance for the price. HDMI v2.1 eARC support. Its downside is poor smart TV but its picture processing and Dolby Vision HDR support more than makes up for it.
  1. LG 55SM9010 - A Curry's exclusive but the only 2019 TV using an IPS panel with local dimming. I really would only recommend this TV if you can't go with an OLED or spend the extra on the much superior Samsung Q80R. It does support the most complete set of HDMI 2.1 features though.
High end TVs above £1000
This is where HDR starts to get really good and the minimum I would go for if you want good HDR. In the case of the OLEDs listed, even those not using much HDR content will see the most gains in picture quality all-around due to OLED tech.
  1. LG 55B9 - Make no mistake, this may be the cheapest OLED but its picture quality in most instances is just as good as TVs costing twice as much money. The downside to this TV is questionable picture accuracy, but it more than makes up for it in price, HDMI connectivity and smart TV. HDMI v2.1 Variable Refresh Rate (VRR), Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) are included for gamers, as is eARC support.
  2. Philips 55OLED754 - I think Philips have made a good move here. Introducing a budget OLED without the poor Android operating system. You still get Philips great motion processing, but without poorer smart TV and a fraction of the cost! The smart system could be replaced with a Nvidia shield, Fire stick or Roku SS+ and it would best any integrated smart TV, offering an upgrade path in the future. This TV also has both Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support, which makes it even better. Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) is the only HDMI 2.1 feature supported on this TV.
  1. Samsung 55Q85R - Samsung have done wonders with their wide viewing angle filter, allowing for the first time LCD TVs with both VA type panels and good viewing angles. Whilst viewing angles don't match an OLED, they make previous TVs using IPS type panels redundant in most cases. Now you can get both good blacks, contrast, screen uniformity and viewing angles in one TV. The downside is currently price, but at its current selling price compared to OLEDs that are arguably a lot better TVs overall. Its however the best value LCD TV in this price category and sweeps the floor in overall quality compared to other LCDs. Being a Samsung 120hz model it includes gaming focused features such as HDMI 2.1 Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) and Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) support, together with the ability to use motion settings without adding extra input lag. Currently the Q80R is not much cheaper, which means this TV including more dimming zones and the one connect box even more appealing.
Premium Models
There is usually little to no need to spend more than the TVs already mentioned above, but I have listed these unless people are willing to spend the extra for a sake of a little better picture processing. Picture quality will be almost indistinguishable to the cheaper TVs.
  1. LG 55C9 - Improves on the B9 with a better picture processor and probably better picture accuracy out of the box. HDMI v2.1 Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) and Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) are included for gamers. HDMI v2.1 eARC included.
  2. Panasonic 55GZ950 - This is the premium model to go for if you want support for both HDR formats and decent video processing. HDMI v2.1 Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) included for gamers.
  3. Sony 55AG8 - Pricing on this model is surprisingly a lot better than last years model. This is the OLED to go for if you want the very best upscaling, sound and motion on a budget. HDMI v2.1 eARC included.
  4. Philips 55OLED804 - Pricing isn't as competitive on this model, but it does have very good motion processing. HDMI v2.1 Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) included for gamers.
Money no object/specialist needs
These TVs should only be considered if you want the very best, accepting that you are paying not for noticeably better performance, but for things like better design and sound built in.
  1. Panasonic 55GZ1000 - Better built in sound than the GZ950. HDMI v2.1 Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) included for gamers.
  2. LG 55E9 - Better built in sound than the C9, more impressive aesthetic design. HDMI v2.1 Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) and Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) are included for gamers. HDMI v2.1 eARC included.
  3. Philips 55OLED984 - Better built in sound than the 804. HDMI v2.1 Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) included for gamers.
  4. Panasonic 55EZ2000 - Extra power delivery makes it the most striking and brightest OLED but it comes at a great cost. HDMI v2.1 Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) included for gamers.
  5. Sony 55AG9 - No idea why this is priced so high, but picture processing is the best you can buy. The sound integrated is very, very good. HDMI v2.1 eARC included.
  1. Samsung 55Q90R - The best and most striking HDR LCD TV you can buy.Being a Samsung 120hz model it includes gaming focused features such as HDMI 2.1 Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) and Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) support, together with the ability to use motion settings without adding extra input lag.
-------------------
Jump to OP
Jump to 24-32"
Jump to 40-43"
Jump to 49-50"
Jump to 55"
Jump to 65"
Jump to 75/77"
Jump to 82"+
Jump to special mentions/reasoning
Jump to FAQ
Jump to latest post[/SPOILER]
 
Last edited:

Dodgexander

Moderator
65" Value per screen size rating: Very Good

The minimum most people should really be considering when wanting to get a benefit from UHD content. You still need to view very close to a 65" TV to see any benefit.

Low range models, up to and around £700
Don't knock TVs at this price range. They are good enough for most people and especially suited for those wanting the best picture quality for non-HDR content such as regular TV, FHD Blu-Rays and the non HDR games consoles. If you are a basic user with a limited budget and you don't need all the bells or whistles these TVs are 90% as good as the higher end ones with most content.
  1. Hisense 65B7100 - At this size and price it bests all the others for value for money. There is little reason to go for the B7500 or U7B which for some reason cost a lot more compared to other sizes.
  1. LG 65UM7400 - Great smart TV, competitive pricing compared to the competition. At this size all the different variations (65UM7xxx ) with all the same picture quality but small difference in aesthetics/features are good buys.
Lower Mid range models up to £900
Most people don't need TVs this good, overall they build on TVs above with better connectivity, superior anti reflection filters. 120hz panels are most common at this price also which means these are the first TVs that allow better control of motion using both motion interpolation and dark frame insertion. Picture processing is generally improved a little compared to cheaper TVs so you can expect slightly better upscaling.
  1. Hisense 65U8B - The king of the mid range, slightly brighter than budget models, 120hz panel for better motion, rudimentary local dimming and Dolby Vision HDR support.
  2. Samsung 65RU8000 - The next best option, gamers may prefer this TV compared to the Hisense as it includes Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) and Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) for gamers. It however comes with very poor dimming and low peak brightness for a mid range model, with no Dolby Vision HDR support.
  1. LG 65SM8500/65SM8600 - If you can stretch to this you get mid range specs at low prices. The SM8600 is another Currys exclusive of the same TV.
Upper Mid range models up to £1300
There's been a fantastic price cut this year putting capable HDR LCDs at affordable prices, hopefully a sign of things to come. These TVs are the first TVs in the list that can display HDR to a good standard and without issues.
  1. Samsung 65Q70R - Samsung are back this year with a best buy! This is the gamer choice due to several Samsung exclusive gaming features. You can use motion interpolation and dark frame insertion without adding input lag. There's HDMI 2.1 Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) support for Xbox/AMD PC graphics cards and Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) is included which is another boost for gamers. Its smart TV platform is also very good. Downside is poorer motion processing, poor picture accuracy in HDR mode and lack of Dolby Vision HDR support. It does however include support for HDR10+.
  2. Sony 65XF9005 - Its not a 2019 model but its still being produced in 2019. Offers superior motion processing, picture accuracy and dolby vision HDR support compared to the Samsung Q70R but has worse smart TV and HDMI connectivity.
  1. LG 65SM9010 - A Curry's exclusive but the only 2019 TV using an IPS panel with local dimming. A better buy at 65" than 55" due to the Samsung Q80R and OLEDs being more expensive. HDMI v2.1 Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) and Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) are included for gamers. HDMI v2.1 eARC support included.
High end TVs above £1500
This is where HDR starts to get really good and the minimum I would go for if you want good HDR. In the case of the OLEDs listed, even those not using much HDR content will see the most gains in picture quality all-around due to OLED tech.
  1. LG 65B9 - Make no mistake, this may be the cheapest OLED but its picture quality in most instances is just as good as TVs costing twice as much money. The downside to this TV is questionable picture accuracy, but it more than makes up for it in price, HDMI connectivity and smart TV. HDMI v2.1 Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) and Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) are included for gamers. HDMI v2.1 eARC support included.
  2. Philips 65OLED754 - I think Philips have made a good move here. Introducing a budget OLED without the poor Android operating system. You still get Philips great motion processing, but without poorer smart TV and a fraction of the cost! The smart system could be replaced with a Nvidia shield, Fire stick or Roku SS+ and it would best any integrated smart TV, offering an upgrade path in the future. This TV also has both Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support, which makes it even better. HDMI v2.1 Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) included for gamers.
  1. Sony 65XG9505 - Its recent price reduction puts it top of the list. Very good motion and HDR performance for the price. HDMI v2.1 eARC support. Its downside is poor smart TV but its picture processing and Dolby Vision HDR support more than makes up for it.
  2. Samsung 65Q85R - Samsung have done wonders with their wide viewing angle filter, allowing for the first time for their to be LCD TVs with both VA type panels and good viewing angles. Whilst viewing angles don't match an OLED, they make previous TVs using IPS type panels redundant in most cases. Now you can get both good blacks, contrast, screen uniformity and viewing angles in one TV. The downside is currently price, but at its current selling price compared to OLEDs that are arguably a lot better TVs overall. Its however the best value LCD TV in this price category and sweeps the floor in overall quality compared to other LCDs. Being a Samsung 120hz model it includes gaming focused features such as HDMI 2.1 Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) and Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) support, together with the ability to use motion settings without adding extra input lag.
Premium Models
There is usually little to no need to spend more than the TVs already mentioned above, but I have listed these unless people are willing to spend the extra for a sake of a little better picture processing. Picture quality will be almost indistinguishable to the cheaper TVs.
  1. LG 65C9 - Improves on the B9 with a better picture processor and probably better picture accuracy out of the box. HDMI v2.1 Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) and Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) are included for gamers. HDMI v2.1 eARC support included.
  2. Sony 65AG8 - Pricing on this model is surprisingly a lot better than last years model. This is the OLED to go for if you want the very best upscaling, sound and motion on a budget. HDMI v2.1 eARC Included.
  3. Panasonic 65GZ950 - This is the premium model to go for if you want support for both HDR formats and decent video processing. HDMI 2.1 Auto Low Latency Mode included(ALLM for gamers).
Money no object/specialist needs
These TVs should only be considered if you want the very best, accepting that you are paying not for noticeably better performance, but for things like better design and sound built in.
  1. Panasonic 65GZ1000 - Better built in sound than the GZ950. HDMI 2.1 Auto Low Latency Mode for gamers included(ALLM).
  2. LG 65E9 - Better built in sound than the C9, more impressive design. HDMI v2.1 Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) and Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) are included for gamers. HDMI v2.1 eARC support included.
  3. Philips 65OLED984 - Better built in sound than the 804, but you pay a lot more for it. HDMI v2.1 Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) included for gamers. Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) are included for gamers
  4. Panasonic 65EZ2000 - Extra power delivery makes it the most striking and brightest OLED but it comes at a great cost. HDMI v2.1 Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) included for gamers.
  5. Sony 65AG9 - No idea why this is priced so high, but picture processing is the best you can buy. The sound integrated is very, very good. HDMI v2.1 eARC Included.
  1. Samsung 65Q90R - The best and most striking HDR LCD TV you can buy. Being a Samsung 120hz model it includes gaming focused features such as HDMI 2.1 Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) and Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) support, together with the ability to use motion settings without adding extra input lag.
-------------------
Jump to OP
Jump to 24-32"
Jump to 40-43"
Jump to 49-50"
Jump to 55"
Jump to 65"
Jump to 75/77"
Jump to 82"+
Jump to special mentions/reasoning
Jump to FAQ
Jump to latest post
 
Last edited:

Dodgexander

Moderator
49/50" Value per screen size rating: Poor

There's not much point having UHD resolution on TVs this large, but the market dictates now we have to buy UHD models so there's no choice. Since these are so small, don't expect to see much of a quality difference in terms of resolution detail from a high quality source. But at the same time, you can expect poorer quality sources to look better too, so depending on your viewing distance these TVs are more suited to those still intending to use a lot of HD material or less.

Low range models, up to and around £400
Don't knock TVs at this price range. They are good enough for most people and especially suited for those wanting the best picture quality for non-HDR content such as regular TV, FHD Blu-Rays and the non HDR games consoles. If you are a basic user with a limited budget and you don't need all the bells or whistles these TVs are 90% as good as the higher end ones with most content.
  1. Hisense 50B7100 - At this size and price it bests all the others for value for money.
  2. Hisense 50B7500 - Same as the B7100 but with Dolby Vision HDR support and a wide colour gamut.
  3. LG 50UM7450 - Same price as the Hisense B7500, no Dolby Vision HDR support and no wider colour spectrum for better colours with HDR, but better built in smart TV. A good choice if you care most about the software of your TV.
  4. Samsung 50RU7100 - Identical spec to the LG, good smart TV, same price, has HDR10+ support, but you'll need the higher end RU7400 for better HDR colours.
  5. Philips 50PUS7334 - A more expensive option, but worth perhaps it if you want both Dolby Vision and HDR10+ formats supported. The picture processing is also very good.
  1. LG 49UM7400 (or 50UM7390/49UM7100) - Great smart TV, competitive pricing compared to the competition. At this size all the different variations (49UM7xxx )have the same picture quality but small these are the ones currently priced best.
  2. Sony 49XG8096 - If you want better motion, but worse smart TV and don't mind paying extra for Sony, then this is a decent buy at the moment, from Curry's sadly. Other model numbers starting with XG8xxx are all the same picture quality, but this is priced well at this time.
Lower Mid range models up to £700
Most people don't need TVs this good, overall they build on TVs above with better connectivity, superior anti reflection filters. 120hz panels are most common at this price also which means these are the first TVs that allow better control of motion using both motion interpolation and dark frame insertion. Picture processing is generally improved a little compared to cheaper TVs so you can expect slightly better upscaling.
  1. Sony 49XG8305 (or 49XG8396) - A step up with motion and picture processing, HDR is still pretty poor, but gets brighter and copes with glare compared to cheaper models.
  1. LG 49SM8500 - If you can stretch to this you get mid range specs at low prices. The SM8600 is currently not worth the extra.
  2. LG 49M9000 - A Curry's exclusive but the only 2019 TV using an IPS panel with local dimming. HDMI 2.1 eARC support, as too is HDMI 2.1 Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) and Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) support for gamers.
Upper Mid range models up to £1000
There's been a fantastic price cut this year putting capable HDR LCDs at affordable prices, hopefully a sign of things to come. These TVs are the first TVs in the list that can display HDR to a good standard and without issues.
  1. Sony 49XG9005 - Offers superior motion processing, picture accuracy and Dolby Vision HDR support compared to the Samsung Q70R but has worse smart TV and only 2 of its 4 HDMI ports are capable of a UHD signal over 30hz.
  2. Samsung 49Q70R - This TV is only using a 60hz panel at this size, so perhaps shouldn't be included in the mid range section. It still retains its good HDR reproduction and good smart TV, but loses the gaming and motion features this TV has at other sizes due to the 60hz panel. It does however retain 4x HDMI 2.0, all supporting UHD over 60hz.
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Jump to OP
Jump to 24-32"
Jump to 40-43"
Jump to 49-50"
Jump to 55"
Jump to 65"
Jump to 75/77"
Jump to 82"+
Jump to special mentions/reasoning
Jump to FAQ
Jump to latest post
 
Last edited:

Dodgexander

Moderator
40/43" - Value per screen size rating: Terrible
There's no much point having UHD resolution on TVs this size really unless you view the TV very , very close (such as a desktop PC monitor) but the market dictates now we have to buy UHD models so there's not really a choice. Since these are so small, don't expect to see any quality difference in terms of resolution detail from a high quality source. But at the same time, you can expect poorer quality sources to look better too, so depending on your viewing distance these TVs are more suited to those still intending to use a lot of of poorer quality sources still.

Low range models, up to and around £300
Don't knock TVs at this price range. They are good enough for most people and especially suited for those wanting the best picture quality for non-HDR content such as regular TV, FHD Blu-Rays and the non HDR games consoles. If you are a basic user with a limited budget and you don't need all the bells or whistles these TVs are 90% as good as the higher end ones with most content.
  1. Hisense 43B7100 - At this size and price it bests all the others for value for money.
  2. Hisense 43B7500 - Same as the B7100 but with Dolby Vision HDR support and a wide colour gamut.
  3. TCL 43DP628 - Wide colour gamut, no
  1. LG 43UM7400 (or 43UM7390/43UM7100) - Great smart TV, competitive pricing compared to the competition. At this size all the different variations (49UM7xxx )have the same picture quality but small these are the ones currently priced best.
  2. Sony 43XG8096 - If you want better motion, but worse smart TV and don't mind paying extra for Sony, then this is a decent buy at the moment, from Curry's sadly. Other model numbers starting with XG8xxx are all the same picture quality, but this is priced well at this time.
Premium
These models generally aren't worth the premium over cheaper models. They are if you are willing to pay the extra for the sake of having the very best available, but don't mind the extra cost. At this size these models are no more than budget ranges at other sizes in specs, but there are one or two things they may do better than the very cheaper TVs.
  1. Panasonic 40GX800 - This TV includes both Dolby Vision+ and HDR10+ HDR formats and its one of a kind in the sense it can actually display HDR video with the least amount of problems due to its Dynamic Tone Mapping feature. What it isn't is a gaming TV any better than cheaper ones mentioned as for games this feature cannot be used. And despite coping with HDR with less issues than other smaller TVs, its still does not have very good HDR hardware, meaning there will be very little gain when you do use HDR content.
  2. Samsung 43Q60R - This TV is a slight step up with motion blur compared to others and may make a slightly better experience when gaming.
  1. Sony 43XG8396 (or 43XG8305) - This is the only TV sub 49" to be using a 120hz panel, so its here for its motion performance. Its cost at this size is astronomical, as much as 3x the price as recommended best buys above.
-------------------
Jump to OP
Jump to 24-32"
Jump to 40-43"
Jump to 49-50"
Jump to 55"
Jump to 65"
Jump to 75/77"
Jump to 82"+
Jump to special mentions/reasoning
Jump to FAQ
Jump to latest post
 
Last edited:

Dodgexander

Moderator
75/77" Value per screen size rating: Average

Now we are talking, big TVs are suited much more to get the most out of UHD, especially if you view close up. You can however expect to pay a premium for models at this size, especially OLEDs.

Low range models, up to and around £1000
Don't knock TVs at this price range. They are good enough for most people and especially suited for those wanting the best picture quality for non-HDR content such as regular TV, FHD Blu-Rays and the non HDR games consoles. If you are a basic user with a limited budget and you don't need all the bells or whistles these TVs are 90% as good as the higher end ones with most content.
  1. Hisense 75B7510 - Dolby Vision HDR support, wide colour gamut all under £1000.
  1. LG 75UM7000 (or 75UM7110) - Great smart TV, no wide colour gamut, no dynamic HDR format support. The 75UM7600 is the same picture quality but currently costs £200 more.
Mid range models up to £1800
Most people don't need TVs this good, overall they build on TVs above with better connectivity, superior anti reflection filters. 120hz panels are most common at this price also which means these are the first TVs that allow better control of motion using both motion interpolation and dark frame insertion. Picture processing is generally improved a little compared to cheaper TVs so you can expect slightly better upscaling.
  1. Samsung 75Q60R - 120hz panel, a very wide colour gamut and HDR10+ support. Includes Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) and Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) for gamers. It however comes with very poor dimming and low peak brightness for a mid range model, with no Dolby Vision HDR support. Unfortunately its not a fantastic HDR performer due to limited high peak brightness and lack of good local dimming.
  1. LG 75UM8610 - Good smart TV, wide colour gamut, 120hz panel but spend the extra for the LG SM9000 if you can.
  2. Sony 75XG8505 - A good option if you prefer the best motion compared to smart TV but spend the extra for the LG SM9000 if you can.
High range models up to £2500
There's been a fantastic price cut this year putting capable HDR LCDs at affordable prices, hopefully a sign of things to come. These TVs are the first TVs in the list that can display HDR to a good standard and without issues.
  1. Samsung 75Q70R - Samsung are back this year with a best buy! This is the gamer choice due to several Samsung exclusive gaming features. You can use motion interpolation and dark frame insertion without adding input lag. There's HDMI 2.1 Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) support for Xbox/AMD PC graphics cards and Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) is included which is another boost for gamers. Its smart TV platform is also very good. Downside is poorer motion processing, poor picture accuracy in HDR mode and lack of Dolby Vision HDR support. It does however include support for HDR10+.
  2. Samsung 75Q85R - Samsung have done wonders with their wide viewing angle filter equipped to higher end TVs, allowing for the first time for their to be LCD TVs with both VA type panels and good viewing angles. Whilst viewing angles don't match an OLED, they make previous TVs using IPS type panels redundant in most cases. Now you can get both good blacks, contrast, screen uniformity and viewing angles in one TV. The downside is currently price, but at its current selling price compared to OLEDs that are arguably a lot better TVs overall. Its however the best value LCD TV in this price category and sweeps the floor in overall quality compared to other LCDs. Being a Samsung 120hz model it includes gaming focused features such as HDMI 2.1 Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) and Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) support, together with the ability to use motion settings without adding extra input lag.
  3. Sony 75XG9505 - Very good motion and HDR performance for the price. HDMI v2.1 eARC support. Its downside is poor smart TV but its picture processing and Dolby Vision HDR support more than makes up for it. Perhaps a better choice if you prefer picture accuracy and prioritise motion performance...but the 75Q85R is probably a better overall TV and the Q70R is quite a bit cheaper. At 75"+ this TV also comes with Sony's superior wide viewing angle/anti reflection filter, whilst its not to the level of Samsung (Q80R and up) its an improvement over the ones equipped on smaller Sony XG9505's.
  1. LG 75SM9000 - Local dimming, good smart TV, Dolby Vision HDR, HDMI v2.1 Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) and Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) are included for gamers. HDMI v2.1 eARC support included.
High end TVs above £3200 and up
This is where HDR starts to get really good and the minimum I would go for if you want good HDR. In the case of the OLEDs listed, even those not using much HDR content will see the most gains in picture quality all-around due to OLED tech.
  1. Samsung 75Q90R - The best and most striking HDR LCD TV you can buy. Being a Samsung 120hz model it includes gaming focused features such as HDMI 2.1 Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) and Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) support, together with the ability to use motion settings without adding extra input lag. HDR is more impressive than the Samsung Q85R but it currently sits at £500 more and £800 more than the Sony 75XG9505.
Money no object/specialist needs
These TVs should only be considered if you want the very best, accepting that you are paying not for noticeably better performance, but for things like better design and sound built in.
  1. Sony 77AG9 - Sitting at the same price as the LG OLEDs this offers a lot better value comparitvely at this price, especially if you want an all in one solution with good sound built in. HDMI v2.1 eARC Included.
  2. LG 77C9 - I would suggest not buying this model currently, but if you want to pay extra for the best set of HDMI 2.1 features its your only option. It should be quite a bit cheaper than the Sony above. HDMI v2.1 Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) and Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) are included for gamers. HDMI v2.1 eARC support included.
  3. LG 77W9 - Niche market thin wallpaper TV. Same picture quality as the C9 but comes with a flat mounting mechanism and a designated soundbar for better sound with an integrated soundbar. Not worth the extra over the Sony 77AG9. HDMI v2.1 Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) and Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) are included for gamers. HDMI v2.1 eARC support included.
  4. Samsung 75Q950R - HDMI 2.1 Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) support for Xbox/AMD PC graphics cards and Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) is included which is another boost for gamers. Its smart TV platform is also very good. Downside is poorer motion processing and lack of Dolby Vision HDR support. It does however include support for HDR10+. Because this model is 8k it also has promised support for 4k signal at 120hz and 8k input which is a first for any HDMI v2.1 equipped TV.
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Dodgexander

Moderator
82+" Value per screen size rating: Poor

Availability in Europe on these models is quite poor, especially in the high end market. Yet this size really does show off UHD content excellently.

Lower Mid range models up to £2000
Most people don't need TVs this good, overall they build on TVs above with better connectivity, superior anti reflection filters. 120hz panels are most common at this price also which means these are the first TVs that allow better control of motion using both motion interpolation and dark frame insertion. Picture processing is generally improved a little compared to cheaper TVs so you can expect slightly better upscaling.
  1. Samsung 82RU8000 - Includes Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) and Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) for gamers. It however comes with very poor dimming and low peak brightness for a mid range model, with no Dolby Vision HDR support. The more expensive Q60R is the same TV but with a wider colour gamut and is not worth the extra.

Upper Mid range models up to £2800
There's been a fantastic price cut this year putting capable HDR LCDs at affordable prices, hopefully a sign of things to come. These TVs are the first TVs in the list that can display HDR to a good standard and without issues.
  1. Samsung 82Q70R - Samsung are back this year with a best buy! This is the gamer choice due to several Samsung exclusive gaming features. You can use motion interpolation and dark frame insertion without adding input lag. There's HDMI 2.1 Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) support for Xbox/AMD PC graphics cards and Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) is included which is another boost for gamers. Its smart TV platform is also very good. Downside is poorer motion processing, poor picture accuracy in HDR mode and lack of Dolby Vision HDR support. It does however include support for HDR10+.
High end TVs above £3500
This is where HDR starts to get really good and the minimum I would go for if you want good HDR. In the case of the OLEDs listed, even those not using much HDR content will see the most gains in picture quality all-around due to OLED tech.
  1. Sony 85XG9505 - It doesn't perform £1000 better than the Samsung Q70R but it is a TV to go for if you need more HDR performance and a better anti glare/wide viewing angle filter. Supports HDMI v2.1 eARC. At 75"+ this TV also comes with Sony's superior wide viewing angle/anti reflection filter, whilst its not to the level of Samsung (Q80R and up) its an improvement over the ones equipped on smaller

Money no object/specialist needs
These TVs should only be considered if you want the very best, accepting that you are paying not for noticeably better performance, but for things like better design and sound built in.
  1. Samsung 82Q950R - The only TV that has good HDR picture quality at this size in EU. There's HDMI 2.1 Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) support for Xbox/AMD PC graphics cards and Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) is included which is another boost for gamers. Its smart TV platform is also very good. Downside is poorer motion processing, poor picture accuracy in HDR mode and lack of Dolby Vision HDR support. It does however include support for HDR10+. Because this model is 8k it also has promised support for 4k signal at 120hz and 8k input which is a first for any HDMI v2.1 equipped TV.
  2. Sony 85ZG9 (or 98ZG9) - A worthy upgrade compared to the Samsung in the motion department but bad smart TV and ludicrous price puts it below in value.
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Dodgexander

Moderator
24/32" - Value per screen size rating: Terrible
There are very little TVs available at this size now, and mostly manufactures do not refresh their lines each year, so you can end up buying TVs several years out of date. There's also very little info about picture quality at this size, so recommendations are next to impossible.

I'd suggest looking at Hisense or LG models, as at least they refresh their model years year by year compared to other manufacturers.
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Dodgexander

Moderator
Gamers - Extra Info
Input lag is low enough in game mode on all TVs now, so in that respect every TV is good at gaming.

If you are shopping in the lower end of the market you'll have to make a choice between better motion blur and viewing angles with an IPS type panel on a TV, or better blacks and contrast from a TV with a VA panel. Once you reach mid range models, TVs with VA type panels start to have less motion blur so its a non-issue.

HDR consoles, PC gaming and future proofing - HDMI v2.1 spec is currently in the transition phase, not all TVs include useful HDM 2.1 gaming features like Auto Low Latency Mode(ALLM) and Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) and some offer both, or a mix of one or the other.

2019 LG OLEDs B9 and over, LCDs SM9000 and over support the largest set of HDMI 2.1 features including ALLM and VRR.

2019 Samsung TVs provided they have a 120hz panel support both ALLM and VRR.

2019 Philips and Panasonic use only ALLM on certain higher end models.

2019 Sony models do not use any gaming HDMI 2.1 features at all.

For VRR to work with Samsung TVs you currently need an Xbox One or One X or AMD Graphics card with Samsung TVs.

For VRR to work with LG TVs you currently can use Xbox Only, as AMD and Nvidia have yet to support drivers for the HDMI 2.1 VRR standard these TVs support. On that note, Nvidia will be enabling Gsync for LG OLEDs, but only the C9 and over in the future.

Samsung models are the only TVs that let you use motion interpolation without adding any input lag, this can be very useful in certain games. This is part of the reason they make good gaming TVs.
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Dodgexander

Moderator
Special Mentions/Reasoning
No doubt the guide will come with lots of questions. You will wonder why certain models you are shopping at are missing from the list, or even why well reviewed products are missing. I hope to explain that here.

The guide is based on current value for money in the UK market, whilst prices are often similar in other regions too (especially Europe) it does not mean if you find a TV cheaper than I did that its not good value if its not in the guide. However I will try an explain my omissions below.

In short, if a TV is not listed, its because it is not good value compared to the competition, as simple as that.

Panasonic (GX800 especially)

There's a distinct lack of Panasonic models in my guide, and for good reason too. Now before you ask, I am a Panasonic fan and I own two Panasonic TVs currently. The problem with Panasonic now is their pricing strategy, simply put; they are charging far too much money for their LCD TVs. Both the GX700 and the well reviewed GX800 are omitted from the best buy guide at all but 40" size. In the GX800's case this was a hard decision because I know it does a lot of things well. It has both Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support and has a world first feature that allows HDR video to be tone mapped allowing a TV without ample HDR hardware to display HDR without any trouble. Not just that, but its picture accuracy is very good. However, and this is a big however, despite the Black Friday price reductions I can't justify adding it to the best buy guide when there are other TVs do that either carry a higher spec or offer similar performance for a lot less money. At 40" I have the GX800 listed in the premium section, if only because at that size its perhaps worth a mention because there are no mid range models available now from other manufacturers beneath 49" in size.

Samsung/Philips models

You'll also notice at most sizes there's a distinct lack of recommendations from Samsung and Philips, Samsung especially at lower sizes. The reason for this is purely the panel lottery.
I don't want to recommend a TV when I do not know for sure which panel type it comes with, and with many Samsung and Philips models they are not included in the guide for that reason.
I've stressed so many times that the most important decision when purchasing a TV is knowing which panel type the TV has. If you don't care which panel type your TV comes with, then by all means buy a Samsung or Philips not listed in the guide, do not however ask me to compare them since I simply can't until I know what panel type comes on the TV.
Also, when seeking which panel comes on which TV, do not rely on websites like displayspeifications.com, its not reliable!
The most steadfast way to determine panel type is find a review of the TV within Europe, or find a bunch of users who have purchased that TV to determine themselves which panel it comes with. If there is a review citing a TV comes with a certain panel type from Samsung or Philips then there's a good chance you will also get the same panel type when you buy the TV...but be aware that Samsung especially are famous from shipping the same TV with multiple types of panel, so whilst you may get excited if another forum member spots his Samsung TV comes with a VA panel, it doesn't mean if you buy the same TV you will necessary end up with the same panel! I suggest not taking the risk since generally there are much better value options anyway, but if you have to, make sure you purchase from a reputable retailer and can return the TV if you are unhappy. You don't want to buy a TV expecting it to have wide viewing angles only to return it because it doesn't. Likewise you don't want to buy a TV expecting blacks, contrast and screen uniformity to be better, only to return it because it doesn't. For this reason these models are omitted from the guide when I do not know the kind of panel they come with.

Samsung QLEDs including the Q60R and Q80R

In the guide, I have mostly omitted the Samsung Q80R because in Europe it was discovered this TV is actually a cut down model compared to the North American Q80R. Yes that's right, Samsung up to their usual tricks trying to deceive customers! The Q85R here is actually the Q80R in North America!
Now that doesn't mean the Q80R may crop up in the guide in the future, after all its still an improvement over the Q70R with higher peak brightness, however on current pricing its worth saving the money for the Q70R or going for the Q85R.

With the Samsung Q60R I have omitted it from the guide completely at most sizes as I believe Samsung are up to dirty tricks with marketing. The TV itself is exactly the same as the cheaper RU8000 at sizes where the RU8000 is available, but the Q60R comes with slightly better colours when used with HDR. Its premium is not usually worth it, especially since its still not a capable TV at displaying HDR anyway. There may be a couple of reasons you may consider it over the RU8000 and that would be the fact it comes with dual tuners instead of a single tuner (useful if you want to record) or if you like the idea of using the QLED exclusive "ambient" mode feature to turn your TV in to a fish tank when you are in the room and not watching TV...but why would you be in the room and not watching your new TV?

Omission of lower range Sony models

Most lower range Sony models have been omitted from the guide as they do not represent good value compared to the competition. For some reason their pricing trends seem to see less reductions compared to other models usually making LG TVs a lot better value.

Omission of certain models at different sizes.

TVs like the LG 86UM7600 may have a specialist need to some, it is in fact the only TV that has wide viewing angles at larger than 82". The problem is its priced at £2500 currently and therefore is about equal in price to much higher end models with VA panels like the Samsung 82Q70R. So whilst I can't recommend it as a best buy given its price, it may be the only option for someone needing wide viewing angles looking at a very large TV.

Niche Sizes

58/60/70" TVs. I haven't included them in the main guide this year because generally they don't offer good value due to lack of competition compared to other sizes. If for whatever reason you need a TV at these sizes. What I do know is all TVs at both 60 or 70 sold now will be using Sharp VA type panels and they are good quality panels. However in 2019 I have not seen models with 120hz versions like last years Sony XF83 series, so if you are shopping for a 60 or 70" TV, the models from Samsung, LG and Philips all these TVs remain in the low range category.

At 58" this year there are a couple of budget oriented models from Samsung and Philips, together with Panasonic. These are not good value compared to 55" models so I haven't included them in the guide. I cannot justify recommending these models compared to other budget options, the Samsung 58RU7100 is listed as £200 more than the equally performing Hisense B7100. However much the same as 60 and 70" sizes this size TVs will for sure be using VA type innolux 60hz panels (Same as Panasonic GX700/GX800) so we know they use VA type panels if you for whatever reason you want to spend more money, for less.

Sound

Sound is poor on almost every TV now, its a good idea to pair a TV with a designated soundbar or sound-system. If you do want better built in sound you only have a few options; at 50" and 55" Philips do their 8 series with B and W speakers integrated...but at 50" the price is extortionate, whilst at 55" the price is decent.

Apart from that you need to look at the premium OLED models. All OLED manufacturers have models that are more "premium" with better integrated sound.

Club/Employee discounts

Pricing in the guide does not reflect club or employee discounts. If you happen to see a large discount through an employee programme or from a B2B shop such as Costco, then by all means mention the deal, but I cannot put it in this guide. Currently Samsung have a 25% discount for students and NHS employees which really make the Samsung models a lot better value.
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Dodgexander

Moderator
FAQ

Q
. What do all the xxxxxx's mean in the model numbers?
A. Manufacturers like to confuse and mislead consumers. The x's put in the model numbers represent different variation of the same performing models. A few examples:

Hisense B7 series - Anything beginning with B7 like the B7100/B7300/B7500 etc are all the same TV as far as picture quality goes. There will be silly differences such as aesthetic design, stand design and or advance features that mean very little to nothing. The only thing worthwhile mentioning in this range is the B7500 comes with a wide colour gamut and Dolby Vision support which means it will be better with HDR, otherwise it performs exactly the same.

Sony (most models) - eg the Sony XG85xx /XG87xx series is a way to represent all models like the XF8505, XF8596 or XF8796.

Samsung - RU8002 is the same as RU8000 and RU7470 is the same as RU7400...stupid differences again like the remote included or regional software differences/aesthetics.

I can't keep track of all the model number differences, if you need to know the exact difference, ask the store that sells the TV or contact the manufacturer directly. They do this stupid crap to avoid price matching, so dirty tricks as usual.

Q. What is a QLED
A. A QLED is a term Samsung decided to use to describe their method of displaying a wider range of colours on their high range TVs. Now adopted by other manufacturers such as Hisense. It is not a comparatively new panel technology like OLED. Do not believe the marketing gimmicks. QLEDs are just LCD TVs!

Q. I want a TV to use for gaming, what are your recommendations?
A. My recommendations here are for gaming also, I do not have specific recommendations for gaming anymore since all TVs now come with low enough input lag for most people. Yes input lag now on TVs is not the issue it once was.

Q. What is a wide colour gamut you speak of?
A. A wide colour gamut can give you a few % more colours with SDR and even more noticeable better colour with HDR.

Q. To get the most from an UHD TV, how close should I view?
Q. How big of a TV should I buy?
Q. I have purchased an UHD TV and I am disappointed by how it handles the content I watch. Why is this?
A. How close you view depends what you want from a TV and what content you use. If you want to notice UHD and get more of an improvement with higher quality sources then you need to view closer to a larger TV.
If you still use the TV to watch content that isn't high quality yet then you are better viewing farther from a smaller TV.
Not only that but never before have we had such a wide variety of source quality differences. More upscaling needed on UHD models = worse picture quality.
More differences, included recommended charts can be viewed here: TV Viewing Distance Guide

Should I upgrade? - UHD vs FHD

Please read the articles before deciding to spend money on a new UHD model.

Q. How will I know which model is better than my old TV?
A. Some people think that new UHD models will make everything look better than your old TV. This is not always the case. A new TV will look better if you feed it good, high quality material and you view close enough to notice a difference. It is not going to look good if you are still viewing content that isn't high quality yet. In many cases its simply better keeping the TV you have. More detail here: Should I upgrade? - UHD vs FHD

Q. My old Plasma is on its way out, which model is comparable?
A. Most people will be happy with any TV on this list coming from a Plasma. Depending whether you need wide viewing angles or prefer better blacks you will need to choose the panel type you want from an LCD TV or go OLED. More detail here: Thinking of replacing your plasma? and differences in motion of all technology here: Explanation and Best Buys for the Motion sensitive

Q. I want good motion processing from a TV. Which model should I go for.
A. That is too general of a question, motion has too many topics to place under one parameter. I have written about differences in motion before here: Explanation and Best Buys for the Motion sensitive

Q. I saw X TV in the shop and Y TV that wasn't in your guide looked better.
A. Never trust what you see in the shop.

Q. How can I tell which panel type a TV comes with?
A. You may never know for sure, certainly before you buy a TV anyway.
There is nothing stopping a manufacturer for changing the panel type it ships on a TV mid production or in the case of some manufactures like Samsung, use different panels on the same TV, sometimes differing per region. Here is the best way you can tell.

Q. What about direct lit or edge lit TVs and local dimming?
A. Until you reach high end models (Sony XF9005 or higher) direct lighting is not a consideration to really think about when purchasing a TV. The talk you read online about direct lit being better is outdated and/or based on the TV also having good local dimming. There may be direct lit versions of cheaper TVs and edge lit versions but since neither will employ any form of usable local dimming the picture quality will be no better on the direct lit model. Of course direct lit TVs are also thicker aesthetically.

Q. What about local dimming?
A. Unless you are looking at higher end LCDs such as the Panasonic FX750 or Sony XF9005 or above local dimming is a specification that is best glossed over. Manufacturers will mention cheaper TVs have local dimming (Samsung, LG, Hisense) but their local dimming does not work well at all and is often best turned off.

Q. What about manufacturer hz spec? I saw one TV with 100hz and another with a 1000hz.
A. Much the same as with local dimming above, manufacturers give incorrect specs and try and mislead consumers when it comes to hz refresh rate. Do not be fooled on their websites or shop websites by higher hz figures, all it means is one TV can use its software to make motion appear smoother and unless you know you are going to use heavy motion interpolation it is best ignored. Most people do not use this feature at all, especially if they do not watch sport. If you can find a spec called panel hz instead and it comes as 50,60,100 or 120hz this is legitimate and a useful spec to look out for. For example the 50" Hisense U7A has a 60hz panel whilst the 55" version has 120hz. With Sony TVs typically they will have dozens of model numbers all with the same picture quality but different quoted fake hz, they all have the same panel refresh rate.

Q. But what about OLED Burn in and its risk?
A. OLED Burn In Risk

Q. Should I buy a high end OLED eg the LG C8 or a high end LCD eg the Samsung Q9FN?
A. You need to decide which technology favours you the best. I would always recommend OLED to someone unless they felt they will be affected by screen burn or they in particular want much more brighter HDR compared to the more refined gains of OLED.

Q. When is the best time to buy a TV?
A. The best time to buy a TV

Q. Why does my new UHD TV look so poor?
A. Should I upgrade? - UHD vs FHD

Q. How do I know the viewing angles I need from a TV?
A. Its quite simple to calculate. A LCD TV with a VA panel looks fine up to 30 degrees to either side of the centre of the TV. If you need a wider viewing angle than that you need an LCD with an IPS panel.
Q. But what about OLED viewing angles?
A. OLEDs have the best viewing angles, looking even better than IPS LCDs at a much tighter angle.

More detail and an example image here.

Q. But what about true 10bit panels? The 10 in HDR10 means I need a high bit-depth TV for good HDR right?
A. No it doesn't. Bit rate is about last criteria to look for when it comes to finding a good HDR TV. There are far more important factors to look out for. More detail here.

Q. I want to understand more about this "banding, vertical banding, dirty screen effect and clouding" I keep hearing about.
Q. I want my TV to be free of "banding, vertical banding, dirty screen effect and clouding"
A. Read this post.

Q. Why have you left certain models out of your guide completely? Surely there must be more choice?
Q. Is x model that isn't in your guide good value?
A. If a model isn't in the guide it is because I believe it to be too expensive to be good value. That doesn't mean it won't be the best value for you, someone may have specific needs that make one TV, no matter how poor in value good for their uses. If you have specific needs that you think aren't met by the guide, please let us know.

Q. Dodge, why do you not recommend UHD gaming?
A. UHD gaming can make for a worse experience than FHD, see: Should I upgrade? - UHD vs FHD

Q. I can't believe you are telling me my older TV is better than a new one? I want to upgrade! I am fed up of having to wind up my TV every evening before I watch it.
A. Believe it or not there have been some cracking TVs over the years, especially in the Plasma and LCD era of only a few years back. Some TVs are just hard acts to follow and will beat many on this list today for quality.
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Jump to 24-32"
Jump to 40-43"
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Jump to 65"
Jump to 75/77"
Jump to 82"+
Jump to special mentions/reasoning
Jump to FAQ
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Dodgexander

Moderator
  1. Initial release 19/11/2019 - Just in time for Black Friday :eek:
  2. Made changes to include Philips 8 series at 55", I believe its actually better value right now than the LG 55SM8600/8500. The model that includes the B and W speakers is also only £100 more currently which represents very good value for a TV with good built in sound. At 50" the same model remains far too expensive though, but I have added some detail in the special mention section under "sound" explaining options for people wanting to get better sound integrated into the TV. At 65" (and the other Philips 8 series models) sound is only better than average. Whilst the 65" price for the 8 series is far too expensive currently compared to 55".
  3. Added comparison of all OLED models link in OP.
  4. Added info on current Samsung 25% off employee/student promotion. thanks @aoaaron
  5. 23/11/2019 - Added extra info to the higher range LCD TVs in the 49" section. The Sony 49XG9005 still retains the same HDMI connectivity as last years XF9005 with only 2/4 ports HDMI v2.0a. The others are HDMI 1.4a only, supporting UHD up to 30hz.
  6. 25/11/2019 - Corrected error in 75" section with Q90R. Thanks @Maninblack
  7. Added Samsung 75Q85R after its recent price drop, making it overall a better buy than the Sony 75XG9505. Edited more detail in the description of each TV.
  8. Altered some pricing to conform with upcoming Black Friday deals. Sony 55XF9005 is now best value in upper mid range. Edited out some false info stating the Sony XF9005 supports eARC. It does not.
 
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mcmental

Active Member
excellent thread, many thanks! going to read through these then see what black friday deals come out, will you be writing up a deals thread Dodgexander soon please?
thanks
 

BigReg79

Standard Member
What's the rule of thumb for panels on LG TVs?

A lot of the LG TVs you recommend are for wider viewing angles/worse contrast etc.

Do they tend to stick with IPS panels even at the larger sizes, or do LG VA panels exist but just aren't worth recommending?
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
excellent thread, many thanks! going to read through these then see what black friday deals come out, will you be writing up a deals thread Dodgexander soon please?
thanks
I'm going to keep an eye on deals and update this thread accordingly, once Black Friday hits its a little while usually until prices are raised again and when they are raised, its not long before they get reduced once more in Xmas sales.
What's the rule of thumb for panels on LG TVs?

A lot of the LG TVs you recommend are for wider viewing angles/worse contrast etc.

Do they tend to stick with IPS panels even at the larger sizes, or are none of the LG VA panels worth recommending?
They stick to IPS panels predominantly because its the type of panel they produce themselves. Its only at 50, 60 or 70" that their TVs use VA, whilst last year they had some 58" models that were also VA. When LG use VA panels, they use panels that are not produced by LG.
 

eeek

Active Member
One comment in the LG 55SM9010 review you say to save and buy the Q80R then you don't mention it except to say the Q80R model is a cut down Q85R. Is that a typo or do you recommend the 55Q80R model.
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
One comment in the LG 55SM9010 review you say to save and buy the Q80R then you don't mention it except to say the Q80R model is a cut down Q85R. Is that a typo or do you recommend the 55Q80R model.
thanks. No the reason I suggest this is because you'll make significant gains going for even the Q80R compared to this TV since its using a VA panel and has wide viewing angles. The Q80R is just a lot more TV for the money than the LG...but I wanted something to put in the guide sub £1000. I've had to revise the guide somewhat because Samsung now have models like the Q80R and up that have better viewing angles than VA type panelled TVs did previously.

In more simple terms, the LG is behind the Q80R in value, whilst the Q80R is behind the Q85R.

My prediction is the Q80R will drop in price, if not come Black Friday, later on. Then it will replace the LG in the guide as sub £1000.
 

bigtruck

Distinguished Member
This is really timely, thanks. I'm looking to replace a 43" Samsung 5 series in our family room & could probably go 50", where the Hisense 7500 makes the most sense.
Got me thinking about moving my Sony 55" W829 from the front room & moving into the family room instead though
 
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mcmental

Active Member
I was going to go for the B9 but after realising I don’t actually watch that much, maybe an hour a night unless The Mighty LEEDS United are on TV! I’m swaying towards a Hisense.
I will have a 5m viewing distance
Watch sports
Netflix
Streaming
Sky hd
 

bigtruck

Distinguished Member
Similar viewing, from about 6ft, straight on. Amazon, Netflix, Virgin Media inc BT Sport. 4k & HD sources.
 

zeppelino

Well-known Member
Good stuff, Dodge - one thing; I’d probably say Q70 or Q80, depending on price difference. So c£100 more and the Q80 would be worth the premium.

Also, read one or two European reviews of the Samsung 74 series (not 50”) and va all round.
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
Good stuff, Dodge - one thing; I’d probably say Q70 or Q80, depending on price difference. So c£100 more and the Q80 would be worth the premium.

Also, read one or two European reviews of the Samsung 74 series (not 50”) and va all round.
Yeah I'm not so sure why the Q80R is currently priced as high as it is, and it differs at different sizes. I'm waiting to see what deals come closer to the day but suspect the margin on the Q80R is a lot more than its currently selling for.

I'll trawl through to see if I can find enough definitive evidence on the Samsung's using VA panels for sure. If there's enough, I'll add them. Believe me, I wish I could.

I decided to mention exact models, based on exact pricing this time around. It was either that or go the old route of recommended TVs based on ranges. But this way it cuts out a lot of the should I pay x extra for y model queries.
 

mistikempire

Active Member
@Dodgexander
Hi mate, I have been following this forum for quite a while now and literally just writting this post to thank you. As I feel it is important that your hard work is appreciated, the amount of time, effort and knowledge you share in making sure everyones questions are answered.

I know many ask questions, which if a little research was done.. Would see it has already been asked by someone else and answered. So I can imagine how frustrating it must be to answer the same questions over and over again.
Ontop you have spent time creating this guide, seriously much appreciated.

You are a gem to this forum mate. 👊
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
@Dodgexander
Hi mate, I have been following this forum for quite a while now and literally just writting this post to thank you. As I feel it really must be appreciated, the amount of time, effort and knowledge you share in making sure everyones questions are answered.

I know many ask questions, which if a little research was done.. Would see it has already been asked by someone else and answered. So I can imagine how frustrating it must be to answer the same questions over and over again.
Ontop you have spent time creating this guide, seriously much appreciated.

You are a gem to this forum mate. 👊
Hey man! Thanks so much for the kind words, I am happy to help! There are people out there who are lot more knowledgeable than me, but I wanted to create a best buy guide that was independent and not just based on the reviews of a single publication. I've used guides for other products in the past, on other forums and its really helped me.

The TV world is a minefield and its terrible in my opinion the tricks manufacturers try to get up to to trick consumers. Hopefully this guide helps everyone get the perfect TV for their own needs.
 

mistikempire

Active Member
I definitely understand what you mean on how they try to trick consumers, after reading allot of your info, so true.
 

aoaaron

Well-known Member
Might wanna mention if you are a student or NHS worker you can get 25% of Samsung QLEDs which improve their value significantly. For example a Q90R 75'' for £2.6k is hard to really compete with when you look at the £5999 77'' LG OLED's
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
Might wanna mention if you are a student or NHS worker you can get 25% of Samsung QLEDs which improve their value significantly. For example a Q90R 75'' for £2.6k is hard to really compete with when you look at the £5999 77'' LG OLED's
There's a section in the OP that states such discounts aren't taken into consideration, but I'll mention this in the FAQ, thanks. I believe though this offer expires soon.
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
Good stuff, Dodge - one thing; I’d probably say Q70 or Q80, depending on price difference. So c£100 more and the Q80 would be worth the premium.

Also, read one or two European reviews of the Samsung 74 series (not 50”) and va all round.
Could you link these reviews? So far in some searching I found a user show an 55" RU7xxx was VA, but I've also seen reports that 43" is definitely IPS this year. Not very conclusive right now, especially when some countries seem to get Slovakian made models, whilst others Hungarian.
 

addytrippy

Novice Member
I'm looking at two LG's at Curry's right now: the LG 65SM8600PLA (£899) and the 65UM7610PLB (£699). The 7 series has "Black Friday pricing now". Is it a good buy currently vs. the 8 series? Should I wait for the 8 series to drop further in price? Richersounds has the 8 series on the same prices with a Black Friday price drop guarantee. I'm quite price sensitive, I would probably buy the more expensive / better TV for a £100 difference, but would just settle for the bit more inferior thing if the difference was £200.
 

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