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NEWS: Filmmaker Mode supported by LG, Panasonic and Vizio at UHD Alliance launch

dr no

Moderator
a very sensible idea
 

cobhc2008

Active Member
Wonder if this will be like the Netflix modes where it's basically a copy of the most accurate OOTB picture mode.
 

furryhobnob

Distinguished Member
Wonder if this will be like the Netflix modes where it's basically a copy of the most accurate OOTB picture mode.
Possibly, but in the isf modes you can still alter anything to your hearts content, by the sounds of this movie mode it won't allow you to turn on motion interpolation etc, to be honest it's pointless as most people into their films will already have any motion settings etc turned off already.
 

Stu C

Active Member
Possibly, but in the isf modes you can still alter anything to your hearts content, by the sounds of this movie mode it won't allow you to turn on motion interpolation etc, to be honest it's pointless as most people into their films will already have any motion settings etc turned off already.
I don't think it's pointless, as this is clearly targeting people that don't understand how to setup their TV or what the advanced settings do.

I get how it will control settings like FI and sharpness enhancement, etc, but I wonder how it will attempt to control colour... This certainly won't include any colour calibration.
 

furryhobnob

Distinguished Member
I don't think it's pointless, as this is clearly targeting people that don't understand how to setup their TV or what the advanced settings do.

I get how it will control settings like FI and sharpness enhancement, etc, but I wonder how it will attempt to control colour... This certainly won't include any colour calibration.
And these same people you are talking about already don't use the most accurate tv modes available to them , so why would they use a new movie mode? They will just leave it on whatever preset it's on when it comes out the box like they do now, that's why it's pointless
 

Eddy555

Distinguished Member
Although if it's getting triggered automatically then it will be used. I'm not sure I'd like the lack of control.
I'd be interested to know how accurate this will actually be when panel variation is taken into consideration. True many TVs are accurate out of the box, but there are still some that stray away from this.
 

furryhobnob

Distinguished Member
Although if it's getting triggered automatically then it will be used. I'm not sure I'd like the lack of control.
I'd be interested to know how accurate this will actually be when panel variation is taken into consideration. True many TVs are accurate out of the box, but there are still some that stray away from this.
It won't get triggered automatically I wouldn't imagine as those getting their tv's calibrated would be miffed
 

Phil Hinton

Editor
Staff member
Like any other feature on a TV, you will be able to switch it off. However, I really welcome things like this and the Netflix Calibrated mode if it gets the wider public at least trying to watch content properly.

This is also not a new feature idea. THX had a version many moons ago that used metadata to set the TV up correctly for SD and HD content, but at the time it wasn't taken on board by manufacturers or content creators.
 

furryhobnob

Distinguished Member
Like any other feature on a TV, you will be able to switch it off. However, I really welcome things like this and the Netflix Calibrated mode if it gets the wider public at least trying to watch content properly.

This is also not a new feature idea. THX had a version many moons ago that used metadata to set the TV up correctly for SD and HD content, but at the time it wasn't taken on board by manufacturers or content creators.
You welcome it as you're into av stuff, the general Joe public won't give a monkey, if they don't use the most accurate modes now why would they use a dedicated movie mode?
I try telling friends etc when visiting about how poor the dynamic mode is they are using with ridiculous soap opera effect, you show them how it should look but they prefer the dynamic mode as the colours have more 'pop' innit bruv.
You can't educate some people unfortunately.
 

Eddy555

Distinguished Member
It won't get triggered automatically I wouldn't imagine as those getting their tv's calibrated would be miffed
From the press release "Notably, unlike some picture modes which may require the user to enter one or more menus to find and select, Filmmaker Mode will be activated either automatically, through metadata embedded in the content, or through a single button which enables the consumer to activate Filmmaker Mode without moving through multiple menu levels."
 

furryhobnob

Distinguished Member
From the press release "Notably, unlike some picture modes which may require the user to enter one or more menus to find and select, Filmmaker Mode will be activated either automatically, through metadata embedded in the content, or through a single button which enables the consumer to activate Filmmaker Mode without moving through multiple menu levels."
I can't see it happening where it automatically selects that mode in all honesty
 

Phil Hinton

Editor
Staff member
You welcome it as you're into av stuff, the general Joe public won't give a monkey, if they don't use the most accurate modes now why would they use a dedicated movie mode?
I try telling friends etc when visiting about how poor the dynamic mode is they are using with ridiculous soap opera effect, you show them how it should look but they prefer the dynamic mode as the colours have more 'pop' innit bruv.
You can't educate some people unfortunately.
I've been doing this and dealing with the public for nearly 20 years now. I know all of the points you make, but that doesn't mean we give up trying to push the right message. People have a choice and all I want is the correct choice to be included and pushed, like the Netflix mode, like the 'Hollywood in your home' and 'From lens to the home' messages. Adding in this filmmaker mode is a welcome idea.

Unlike the rest of the TV reviewers in Europe where measurements and education of readers is healthy, we sadly still have an 'old boys club' in the UK who just don't understand image quality and how it should look, amongst all the major publications. Until that changes, there is going to be a confusing message and TV review coverage in the UK that is skewed to someone's personal preferences and not on the actual image quality of a TV against well-established standards.

It probably is a waste of breath on the vast majority of the public, but at the same time, those people don't spend more than a few hundred on their TV experience. So I believe the message will slowly start to creep in as it has done over the last 10 years and with better metadata technologies and more accurate TVs, it will continue to grow from just an enthusiasts interest.

And again, this mode will have an off switch for those who don't want it. But it will work, as HDR switching does now, on metadata telling the TV the correct set up for the content. THX was doing this kind of thing 10 years ago with Media Director.
 

BrightonChris

Distinguished Member
Your average watcher wouldn't know what the most accurate mode is. 'ISF expert' or whatever is meaningless. So something a bit more explicit like this might encourage those people to select and accurate mode. Maybe it won't. No harm done.
 

Simba

Distinguished Member
So to achieve this mode, the TV's will be calibrated at the factory? Would there still be a need for ISF calibration/ modes? Would be interesting to know how they compare as the ambient lighting would still be a factor e.g. brightness
 

Phil Hinton

Editor
Staff member
So to achieve this mode, the TV's will be calibrated at the factory? Would there still be a need for ISF calibration/ modes? Would be interesting to know how they compare as the ambient lighting would still be a factor e.g. brightness
It won't be perfect, it is a tool to get people into the correct settings. Saying that, almost every TV I have measured this year out of the box (manufacturer and retailer supplied) have been very accurate and to a level that even videophiles would struggle to tell are OOTB.
 

ggrossen

Active Member
As long as this doesn't interfere with a calibrated TV then I'm fine with this option. I presume it would be slightly fancier version of Real Cinema which from memory is locked when autocal is on. I'm hopeful that if LG implement this correctly it should not interfere with a calibrated TV and in fact they may do the same with this as they did with the Real Cinema option - George
 

Phil Hinton

Editor
Staff member
As long as this doesn't interfere with a calibrated TV then I'm fine with this option. I presume it would be slightly fancier version of Real Cinema which from memory is locked when autocal is on. I'm hopeful that if LG implement this correctly it should not interfere with a calibrated TV and in fact they may do the same with this as they did with the Real Cinema option - George
It won't interfere, there will be an off switch like there is for most features on modern TVs.
 

Coulson

Well-known Member
And these same people you are talking about already don't use the most accurate tv modes available to them , so why would they use a new movie mode? They will just leave it on whatever preset it's on when it comes out the box like they do now, that's why it's pointless
And if they do use the new mode the resulting picture might be alien to them especially if they are used to vivid mode colours and sharpness.
 

jwsg

Well-known Member
Hopefully its simple like ALLM where the TV just switches to a - in this case Cinema - preset (which you can configure as now). Nice that LG is on board because I haven't seen ALLM appear on my 2018 LG even though Denon kindly added it the receiver.

Therein lies the next problem - all the recent metadata expansions ALLM DV HLG have required changes to the receiver HDMI passthrough too - so I bet this is not going to be as simple as it sounds in the announcement. In fact the whole thing makes no mention of what HDMI standard is applicable or whether its disk, streaming, or broadcast.

Also some colour regrades on film re-issues havent been for the best, so not every "Director's Vision" is AV perfection.
 

raduv1

Distinguished Member
You welcome it as you're into av stuff, the general Joe public won't give a monkey, if they don't use the most accurate modes now why would they use a dedicated movie mode?
I try telling friends etc when visiting about how poor the dynamic mode is they are using with ridiculous soap opera effect, you show them how it should look but they prefer the dynamic mode as the colours have more 'pop' innit bruv.
You can't educate some people unfortunately.
Yup fully agree , family n friends of mine with shiny new ( expensive) 4K displays usually go with a dynamic type of picture I've found. I've suggested putting it in the most accurate mode or the like but the words used by them are usually , dull, dark ,etc ...
 

EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
They need a better name for it. When I saw 'Filmmaker mode' I assumed it was something for editing videos given the massive popularity of streaming and youtubers at the moment.
 

Lesmor

Distinguished Member
@Phil Hinton wish someone would tell Epson about switching to 4K HDR mode but I digress

Are terrestrial broadcasters on board with this?
it seems more suited to movies played back through either a player or Netflix
what happens when you watch a film through terrestrial TV?
 

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