Question Seeing as 4kbluray looks like the endgame physical format - Should I be worried about longer term disk rot?

jizzlejimbo

Active Member
At the moment I stream everything but I really want to own my favourite films on 4kbluray.

Realistically how long will these disks last if they're kept in a standard bookshelf. I don't want them getting bit rot after 5 years, if I invest i'd prefer if they will be usable over the longer term.
 

Greg Hook

Moderator & Reviewer
I really wouldn't be concerned about that. 5 years is an incredibly long time in the AV world and if that ever happened you could easily replace them for probably 50p by then.
 

ssbib

Distinguished Member
I’ve got DVDs that are coming up to 20 years old and they still play without an issue.
 

hippo99

Distinguished Member
Equally, large numbers of HD-DVDs have rotted in a relatively short space of time.

In essence, it’s impossible to answer OPs question as none of us has a crystal ball.
UHD may be as long lasting as CD/DVD. It may rot away like HD-DVD - nobody has the answer or can shed any light as to which will happen.
 

Blupetros

Well-known Member
One would hope they learnt their lesson with the HD-DVD problem. There was obviously a problem there with the manufacturing plant. I had rot on some CD's pressed by the PDO plant and that was recognised as a manufacturing fault. They did a replacement scheme and I had a box set of 12 cd's replaced.
 

shotokan101

Distinguished Member
If in doubt rip them.......
 

Donnacha

Distinguished Member
Equally, large numbers of HD-DVDs have rotted in a relatively short space of time.

In essence, it’s impossible to answer OPs question as none of us has a crystal ball.
UHD may be as long lasting as CD/DVD. It may rot away like HD-DVD - nobody has the answer or can shed any light as to which will happen.
Wasn't that primarily confined to Warner Bros. discs? I have plenty of HD-DVDs from Universal and Paramount that play fine. I'm more concerned about the lack of a HDDVD player in the future
 

hippo99

Distinguished Member
Wasn't that primarily confined to Warner Bros. discs? I have plenty of HD-DVDs from Universal and Paramount that play fine. I'm more concerned about the lack of a HDDVD player in the future
Warner discs were certainly very badly affected, but I’ve definitely read that it’s not just Warner discs.

Your Universal/Paramount discs are fine now, but we can’t know whether they will be ok or will have rotted in another 5 years time.
Main point to OP is still that none of us knows whether the discs will rot in the future as we can’t see into the future.
 

FevreDream

Active Member
I’ve got Blu Rays from around 13 years ago that still play fine. I wouldn’t worry.
 

Clem_Dye

Distinguished Member
The key is making sure that the media is stored correctly, in their cases, out of direct sunlight, and in a cool place without too much temperature variation. I have CDs that I bought when the medium first surfaced which still play fine, same with DVDs, some which I've had for approaching 20 years, and some of my blu-rays are at least 10 years old now and seem to be OK (touch wood!).

I think that things have moved on in terms of pressing quality. I had a number of DVDs that under a certain light would look milky -- interlayer blooming, as I remember it being called, something to do with the way that the layers were glued together, as I recall (but could be mis-remembering). Those I did view with some suspicion, but I no longer have any of them. Whether that is similar to the HD-DVD rot issue I have no way of telling.

The obvious way to secure the contents of a library is to rip them to create images on computer, as backups. I've been looking at doing this on my Mac, but it's a time-consuming process, by all accounts, and you need plenty of storage space. Perhaps we should start a thread to discuss this. It seems a bit of a black art to me, but from what I can make out, it's certainly possible to generate high quality uncompressed images of media that will play back on modern BR players or other devices that can stream or handle USB media.
 

Sloppy Bob

Distinguished Member
I've been ripping for years. I have an 8-bay NAS with over 1000 movies and many TV shows on it.
A few DVD's that have never had better releases. Mainly Blurays and some UHD's.
I stream them around the house to 3 different TV's using media streamers hooked up to each TV.

I couldn't go back to using discs and having them clutter the place up.

As long as you're not bothered by menus and extras it's easy for movies. You just rip to an MKV, single file with the best audio quality with any commentary tracks you want and any subs you want. You can rip the extras as well but you'll end up with a lot of files and indexing them for easy playback can be a pain. I'm not bothered and rarely watch them, perhaps when I get the disc but after that it's ripped and forgotten about.

I also have a backup as even using RAID on the NAS, I really don't fancy ripping everything again should the worst happen.
 

hippo99

Distinguished Member
The key is making sure that the media is stored correctly, in their cases, out of direct sunlight, and in a cool place without too much temperature variation. I have CDs that I bought when the medium first surfaced which still play fine, same with DVDs, some which I've had for approaching 20 years, and some of my blu-rays are at least 10 years old now and seem to be OK (touch wood!).

I think that things have moved on in terms of pressing quality. I had a number of DVDs that under a certain light would look milky -- interlayer blooming, as I remember it being called, something to do with the way that the layers were glued together, as I recall (but could be mis-remembering). Those I did view with some suspicion, but I no longer have any of them. Whether that is similar to the HD-DVD rot issue I have no way of telling.

The obvious way to secure the contents of a library is to rip them to create images on computer, as backups. I've been looking at doing this on my Mac, but it's a time-consuming process, by all accounts, and you need plenty of storage space. Perhaps we should start a thread to discuss this. It seems a bit of a black art to me, but from what I can make out, it's certainly possible to generate high quality uncompressed images of media that will play back on modern BR players or other devices that can stream or handle USB media.
Pretty sure I’ve read the HD-DVD disc rot is due to the glue used on discs, so it won’t make any difference how you store it as the chemical reaction that rots it is going to happen.
 

Clem_Dye

Distinguished Member
Sure, and that’s what I think that the interlayer blooming issue was that was seen on some early DVDs. HD-DVD lost in the battle with blu-ray, in the same way as betamax lost against vhs. In both cases, the better format lost out due to a lack of support.
 

jizzlejimbo

Active Member
Sure, and that’s what I think that the interlayer blooming issue was that was seen on some early DVDs. HD-DVD lost in the battle with blu-ray, in the same way as betamax lost against vhs. In both cases, the better format lost out due to a lack of support.
I thought Blu-ray was the superior format at least technically?
 

Clem_Dye

Distinguished Member
I don’t recall. I thought that there wan’t much in it, but HD-DVD got killed by the lack of film studio support.
 

featherhall

Distinguished Member
I don’t recall. I thought that there wan’t much in it, but HD-DVD got killed by the lack of film studio support.
pretty sure it was Warner who eventually went solely Blu that killed of HDDVD. That was the end and the fact SONY were Blu only
 

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