Sony A8 (A8H) 4K OLED TV Review & Comments

Kotatsu Neko

Well-known Member
I remember hearing that the peak brightness of OLEDs could be pushed to around 1000 nits, and yet here we are in 2020 and we're still seeing full field brightness capped at a miserable 160nits and even a microscopic 1% window only hitting 640nits.

As much as I love my OLED it's an ancient B7 and it's disappointing to see how little progress has been made since. There's no reason for me to upgrade, and I guess I might have to wait for non-Samsung MicroLED (no DV will always be a deal breaker), if that ever exits, to get something which is truly an upgrade.

Earlier this year I bought a 1000nit 512 zone FALD PC gaming monitor and it certainly makes for an interesting comparison with my OLED. The brightness is far, far higher, and if it has an ABL it's pretty subtle, so full screen white is like staring into a floodlight. But FALD, even with 512 zones is an ugly mess of bloom and afterglow, pixel response time (even on a high end gaming display) is awful, and unless you're right in the sweet spot the screen washes out immediately. All in all the OLED easily beats it, but HDR sure does pop with 1000nits.
 

golden phoenix

Distinguished Member
this hdmi 2.1 thing just rumbles on...its been a few years since its been available now, and manufacturers still seem reluctant to future proof their tvs for consumers..why? especially Sony which is crazy.
 

LCDseeker

Well-known Member
this hdmi 2.1 thing just rumbles on...its been a few years since its been available now, and manufacturers still seem reluctant to future proof their tvs for consumers..why? especially Sony which is crazy.
Could there be a reason for this? LG CX OLEDs suffering from screen tearing so maybe Sony are working on resolving that first with their 2.1. In reality not much will be available in 2.1 anyway, and I suspect it will remain like this for a long time to come.
 

LCDseeker

Well-known Member
I remember hearing that the peak brightness of OLEDs could be pushed to around 1000 nits, and yet here we are in 2020 and we're still seeing full field brightness capped at a miserable 160nits and even a microscopic 1% window only hitting 640nits.

As much as I love my OLED it's an ancient B7 and it's disappointing to see how little progress has been made since. There's no reason for me to upgrade, and I guess I might have to wait for non-Samsung MicroLED (no DV will always be a deal breaker), if that ever exits, to get something which is truly an upgrade.

Earlier this year I bought a 1000nit 512 zone FALD PC gaming monitor and it certainly makes for an interesting comparison with my OLED. The brightness is far, far higher, and if it has an ABL it's pretty subtle, so full screen white is like staring into a floodlight. But FALD, even with 512 zones is an ugly mess of bloom and afterglow, pixel response time (even on a high end gaming display) is awful, and unless you're right in the sweet spot the screen washes out immediately. All in all the OLED easily beats it, but HDR sure does pop with 1000nits.
I'm not sure this will ever happen. The organic nature of OLED means too bright and screen burn will take place. Microled is the future.
 

ozzzy189

Distinguished Member
There's no way on earth I'd buy a TV without hdmi 2.1 these days. Ridiculous. Ps5 ready my backside.
 

ozzzy189

Distinguished Member
I remember hearing that the peak brightness of OLEDs could be pushed to around 1000 nits, and yet here we are in 2020 and we're still seeing full field brightness capped at a miserable 160nits and even a microscopic 1% window only hitting 640nits.

As much as I love my OLED it's an ancient B7 and it's disappointing to see how little progress has been made since. There's no reason for me to upgrade, and I guess I might have to wait for non-Samsung MicroLED (no DV will always be a deal breaker), if that ever exits, to get something which is truly an upgrade.

Earlier this year I bought a 1000nit 512 zone FALD PC gaming monitor and it certainly makes for an interesting comparison with my OLED. The brightness is far, far higher, and if it has an ABL it's pretty subtle, so full screen white is like staring into a floodlight. But FALD, even with 512 zones is an ugly mess of bloom and afterglow, pixel response time (even on a high end gaming display) is awful, and unless you're right in the sweet spot the screen washes out immediately. All in all the OLED easily beats it, but HDR sure does pop with 1000nits.
Buy the Panasonic oled, can't remember the model but it hit 1000 nits, unfortunately no hdmi 2.1 though.
 

Kotatsu Neko

Well-known Member
Buy the Panasonic oled, can't remember the model but it hit 1000 nits, unfortunately no hdmi 2.1 though.
The Pannys are ludicrously expensive, and as you say, no HDMI 2.1 either. Plus according to our very own Phil Hinton, they max out at 838 nits on a 10% window. Good for an OLED for sure, but it drops to a rather comical 130nits on a full screen of white.
 
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ozzzy189

Distinguished Member
I think this is the HZ2000, the only OLED I'd buy....if I had the crazy money needed. I really don't see the fuss about HDMI 2.1.
Its for gaming really. If you don't game on it it's not a problem.
 

celle

Active Member
I'm not sure this will ever happen. The organic nature of OLED means too bright and screen burn will take place. Microled is the future.
Nonsense. At the moment organic emitters are more durable than inorganic. You will also get "burn in" with Microled TFT displays. You have to compare apples with apples and not apples with oranges. LG´s WOLED concept is also not the only OLED concept for displays and even WOLED can evolve further than now (new blue emitter, top emission, different subpixel layout, better filtering). LGD invested in infrastructure. First make WOLED cheaper, then make it better. Now they have Guangzhou and a monthly production of 130.000 substrates (more than the last 8.5G LCD plant from Samsung Display in Korea) and with another 30.000 in the pipeline, they can make 10 million OLED-TVs in a year. You will see next year, what it means not having the infrastructure with QDOLED prices...
 

SimonST

Distinguished Member
Edit: phone screwed up :facepalm:
 
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Clearandcolour

Active Member
I had an intention to buy the sony oled A8.. But last Saturday I saw this A8 next to a Philips 855 oled in the shop. With 'Tour de France' via cable on it in 1080i.. The sony looked not good next to the philips which I checked was in standard-mode.. Sony looked very unsharp.. The philips looked much cleaner, perfect sharpness. Even the Hisense-Oled looked better than the sony. Dissappointment because I thought to buy the sony because of the sound coming directly from the screen..
But now I like the philips 855. I know, I should compare them better with maybe different settings. But the philips 855 also has a nicer stand which is at a nice height... Higher than 2019's 854 which was much too low to place a sounbar. And the swivel for the philips is very nice also.
.
 
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LCDseeker

Well-known Member
Nonsense. At the moment organic emitters are more durable than inorganic. You will also get "burn in" with Microled TFT displays. You have to compare apples with apples and not apples with oranges. LG´s WOLED concept is also not the only OLED concept for displays and even WOLED can evolve further than now (new blue emitter, top emission, different subpixel layout, better filtering). LGD invested in infrastructure. First make WOLED cheaper, then make it better. Now they have Guangzhou and a monthly production of 130.000 substrates (more than the last 8.5G LCD plant from Samsung Display in Korea) and with another 30.000 in the pipeline, they can make 10 million OLED-TVs in a year. You will see next year, what it means not having the infrastructure with QDOLED prices...
That's a BIG first. Please provide the science to support the claim organic are more durable than inorganic? I'm keen to learn more.
 

Steve Stifler

Well-known Member
In my opinion, HDMI 2.1 and filmmaker mode missing on newly launched TVs is typical of our hobby. It generates FOMO and associated upgraditis.

From Phil‘s review, it seems to be a cracking telly and not stupid money. Unfortunately management at home won’t countenance a large screen in the lounge. Thank heavens for a separate cinema room. Not everyone is so fortunate though.
 

Kotatsu Neko

Well-known Member
In my opinion, HDMI 2.1 and filmmaker mode missing on newly launched TVs is typical of our hobby. It generates FOMO and associated upgraditis.

From Phil‘s review, it seems to be a cracking telly and not stupid money. Unfortunately management at home won’t countenance a large screen in the lounge. Thank heavens for a separate cinema room. Not everyone is so fortunate though.
Amusingly my wife wants us to get an 85" screen and speakers in the ceiling.
 

giggsy1950

Active Member
Hi Phil, fine review as always. I'm not quite ready to upgrade yet but always read the reviews with interest. With regard to the Dolby Vision implementation on this screen, I have seen in other reviews that with the Sony screens, the Dolby Vision is 'player led' rather than the screen carrying out the Dolby Vision 'stuff'. Can you possibly explain what this means and if you have noticed any differences to other panels re: Dolby Vision? Many thanks.
 

Cheshire Cat

Standard Member
this hdmi 2.1 thing just rumbles on...its been a few years since its been available now, and manufacturers still seem reluctant to future proof their tvs for consumers..why? especially Sony which is crazy.
Why? Because manufacturers want you to change your set every 2-3 years. In reality, most of us could and should keep our sets for 5-10 years, but are ‘persuaded’ to change for features that don’t really add a great deal to the viewing experience.
2020 sets are a case in point - most are a case of ‘old wine in new bottles’ and a number are a downgrade on their 2019 equivalents. Unless you absolutely need to buy, there is no reason to get a 2020 set other than as a ‘vanity’ purchase.
 

furryhobnob

Distinguished Member
Why? Because manufacturers want you to change your set every 2-3 years. In reality, most of us could and should keep our sets for 5-10 years, but are ‘persuaded’ to change for features that don’t really add a great deal to the viewing experience.
2020 sets are a case in point - most are a case of ‘old wine in new bottles’ and a number are a downgrade on their 2019 equivalents. Unless you absolutely need to buy, there is no reason to get a 2020 set other than as a ‘vanity’ purchase.
Or you want 4k 120fps from the new consoles being released, i dont think the 2019 models do that. So not just vanity, if you're not a gamer then there is no reason whatsoever to upgrade from last year's models
 

Gallo73

Standard Member
Will Sony ever give us same Dolby Vision version as LG and Panasonic?
And not the low-latency version.
 

marios50

Active Member
Coming from someone who owns and uses almost daily both a Panny and a Sony OLED, the DV implementation on the Sony lacks quite a bit. They should have fixed it by now really.
 

TruroSpurs

Standard Member
Why? Because manufacturers want you to change your set every 2-3 years. In reality, most of us could and should keep our sets for 5-10 years, but are ‘persuaded’ to change for features that don’t really add a great deal to the viewing experience.
2020 sets are a case in point - most are a case of ‘old wine in new bottles’ and a number are a downgrade on their 2019 equivalents. Unless you absolutely need to buy, there is no reason to get a 2020 set other than as a ‘vanity’ purchase.
I do tend to keep my sets for 5 - 10 years which is why I'm finding the lack of TV's with HDMI 2.1 frustrating especially as I'm a big gamer and in need of an upgrade.
 

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