Support for Windows 7

maf1970

Well-known Member
W10 is not a good OS thats why they have had to do rebuilds of it
They did rebuilds of XP,Vista,7 and 8 when required as well. Does that mean that all of these are bad as well ?

Millions didn't choose by the way they was forced with when buying new systems w10 was only option
When given an option, nobody is going to buy an older OS when they can have the current one. Second, MS have always been very clear about their development model and that it would result in a new OS every so often. You also have to be aware of the evolution to understand why there has been successive OSs.

even the likes of University campus they would not allow W7 systesm to connect to the wifi which is another reason you see the students get free upgrade which again is forced.
What a load of **** !!! If a university restricts what can use wifi on its premises that is their choice and will be from a support point of view.
 
They did rebuilds of XP,Vista,7 and 8 when required as well. Does that mean that all of these are bad as well ?



When given an option, nobody is going to buy an older OS when they can have the current one. Second, MS have always been very clear about their development model and that it would result in a new OS every so often. You also have to be aware of the evolution to understand why there has been successive OSs.



What a load of **** !!! If a university restricts what can use wifi on its premises that is their choice and will be from a support point of view.

They did not rebuild XP or W7 I should know I have been a Windows tester since 98.

No one said to buy W7 but it's still an option for people to use if they have a key or access to one.

MS model has always been to make $$$ the world has changed now so they have had to change the model people wont pay £100+ for new OS every few years so they have switched to services/cloud which is why W10 will be around for a very long time.

Not true lots of people would rather have W7 which is why the market before the annoucement about stopping support was over 40% of older OS machines still so why would that be if W10 is new and free because people don't like it and as I already stated lots more would of stayed on older OS but have been forced to move on to W10 with new hardware purchases.

No Uni do not choose to not support W7 it has been forced on them due to partnerships that MS has with Cisco even the IT engineers on campus don't understand it and Cisco blag about it claiming it works with W7 when it does not then suddenly changed their tune that network prtotcols in W7 are the problem like people are idiots.
 

maf1970

Well-known Member
They did not rebuild XP or W7 I should know I have been a Windows tester since 98.
Says it all, there is a big difference between coder and tester !!!

No one said to buy W7 but it's still an option for people to use if they have a key or access to one.

MS model has always been to make $$$ the world has changed now so they have had to change the model people wont pay £100+ for new OS every few years so they have switched to services/cloud which is why W10 will be around for a very long time.
Most people didn't pay for an OS seperately, in most cases it was supplied as part of the computer package. Also if people knew that you can upgrade most of the desktops and laptops available from the likes of HP and Dell at no cost to W10 do you think they would say No ??

No Uni do not choose to not support W7 it has been forced on them due to partnerships that MS has with Cisco even the IT engineers on campus don't understand it and Cisco blag about it claiming it works with W7 when it does not then suddenly changed their tune that network prtotcols in W7 are the problem like people are idiots.
Just because the Uni near you doesn't support doesn't mean to say it is the same at all the others. Neither of the two Universities beside me have those sort of issues with W7 but they do have issues with Apple kit and WiFi.
 

techquest

Well-known Member
@triplea4uk sounds as though you're an angry windows tester, maybe a sales prevention officer in the making! Maybe time to find another job if you can't accept that companies and there systems always move on.
 

dugn

Standard Member
Very new here, but want to clarify things on this post.

Windows 7 to Windows 10 'In Place' Upgrade
Windows 10 upgrades from Windows 7 are still free. If your hardware isn't >6 years old, it'll likely work fine. Search for an find the link on Microsoft's site to use the Windows 10 Media Creation Tool. There, you'll find a Downloads Tool, choose the option to upgrade the PC in place (which doesn't require a license key). A fresh install using this tool (where you don't preserve your files and applications) will require a legal Windows 10 license key which you should only purchase from a reputable source.

If the in-place upgrade evaluates your system and thinks there will be a problem, it will let you know. @techquest is correct on all points - including the fact that some upgrades may need to take overnight while the upgrade stumbles over a few drivers it didn't think you be problems (but actually are).

Staying on Windows 7
There are no scare tactics about staying on Windows 7. It's an old OS that works wonderfully - but will no longer get security updates. At first, that may not sound like a big deal. But once a security vulnerability is fixed and released by Microsoft, hackers reverse engineer the patch to find out how they can hack into un-patched machines. Then they search for PCs on the internet that lack the patch and take them over. It only takes a few days after a patch is released for hackers to reverse engineer the vulnerability. And mere minutes to find and infect unprotected PCs connected to the internet. Firewalls will stave off some of these attacks, but not all. So the longer you remain on Windows 7, the more your data and personal control over your PC is likely to be overtaken by hackers. It's not a scare tactic. It's reality. Home users can't get 'extended support' for Windows 7 to keep is alive (and secure) longer. Only enterprises already paying gobs of money to MSFT for an Enterprise Support Agreement get the privilege of paying $50 per PC to get security updates for Windows 7 for the next year (price goes to $100 per PC the 2nd year, then even higher the 3rd year). Common folk like us don't get this.

Make Windows 10 Act Like Windows 7
Since MSFT let all of their testers go years ago - then put the young kids running the Windows Phone division in charge of Windows for PCs, the quality of Window 8/8.1/10 updates turned sour and never fully recovered. Unfortunately, that's what we're left with: Either move to Linux or upgrade to Windows 10 even though bad updates slip through regularly. But you can take some of the edge off of Win10's newness by making it look and act mostly like Windows 7. Some tips:
  1. Replace the hyperactive and annoying Windows 10 Start menu with the original Windows 7 start button and menu structure. Lots of apps do this, some for free. But my favorite is the $3 StartIsBack. Configure StartIsBack to NOT display Windows 10 glyphs and not show Modern Apps - and it'll hide most of the unnecessary Windows 10-looking apps from view.
  2. Find and download the Windows Live Essentials app installer online (FREE) which gives you the outdated but fully functional and awesome Photo Viewer and Movie Maker.
  3. Go to Settings | Apps | Default Apps and replace the default Music Player with your favorite (Windows Media Player, MediaMonkey, whatever), default Photo Viewer to the Windows Live Photo viewer, Video Player to Windows Media Player, Change your default browser from Edge to your favorite (ignore the 'Edge Is Better' prompt they nag you with). If you have a favorite email app, switch from the crappy Windows 10 Mail app that your favorite (Outlook or otherwise).
Hit me up if I can be of any additional help. I'm pretty knowledgeable with Windows and hardware that runs Windows. Glad to help where I can. Cheers.
 
Last edited:

maf1970

Well-known Member
Windows 7 to Windows 10 'In Place' Upgrade
Windows 10 upgrades from Windows 7 are still free. If your hardware isn't >6 years old, it'll likely work fine. Just click this link and use the Downloads Tool and choose the option to upgrade the PC in place (which doesn't require a license key) - but a fresh install using this tool (where you don't preserve your files and applications) will require a legal Windows 10 license key which you should only purchase from a reputable source.
True to a point. The big manufacturers(Dell,HP etc) have decided that their kit can be updated to W10 per say. This is something they don't broadcast but most kit can be updated this way. I have successfully done a Dell machine from 2010 amongst others. This has also been done as a fresh install and has not required a key. This has worked for machines both originally on 7 & 8.
 

deans6571

Well-known Member
...so how safe is Windows 7 now that official support has ended?

From the articles I have read (BBC and other various news sites) they suggest to NOT do online banking or even use email on a Windows 7 machine (my office is 90% STILL using Windows 7) ?!!

Does this mean its now no longer safe to even access online email accounts like Gmail, Yahoo, etc...?!

o_O
 

techquest

Well-known Member
...so how safe is Windows 7 now that official support has ended?

From the articles I have read (BBC and other various news sites) they suggest to NOT do online banking or even use email on a Windows 7 machine (my office is 90% STILL using Windows 7) ?!!

Does this mean its now no longer safe to even access online email accounts like Gmail, Yahoo, etc...?!

o_O
Microsoft is not telling you that W7 won't work, they are saying that after a certain date they will no longer support W7, save enterprise versions. It is down to manufacturers of programs and hardware on your system to decide if they will continue to support W7.

Chrome for instance is no longer supported for security updates in XP or Vista by Google, Mozilla Firefox is the same. Basically this means with MS no longer supporting an OS if hackers find vulnerabilities to exploit and cause security problems, MS will no longer be monitoring or rectifying those problems by way of Security Updates, as they used too, on a monthly basis.

So it will be up to you to ensure that your anti virus and firewall is good to go, there are plenty of them available and you should make sure whatever you use is updated on a regular basis. It is also down to you or other users of your machine(s) to make sure that they are surfing the net and dealing with emails correctly so that your system does not become vulnerable and left open to be exploited.
 

LV426

Administrator
Staff member
The point here is this:
Once "support" is ended - so that is now for Win7 - IF the operating system is hacked in some way leaving users open to attack (eg to compromise security on eg banking sites) then MS are no longer going to attempt to fix it.
Hence - not now, not immediately - but at some point, if it's hacked (and history suggests it might very well be) Win7 users MAY render themselves an open target. And likely you may not even know it has happened, until your money (or something) is affected.
Hence the strong recommendation to update.

Personal view: Win10 is as good an OS as MS have ever made and I'm entirely happy to be a Win10 user. I do not at all understand the negativity and/or reluctance some express. Maybe I'm just lucky with my hardware and/or my choice of installed software, but I experience little in the way of problems and certainly no more than I did when I was still using 7.
 

techquest

Well-known Member
The point here is this:
Once "support" is ended - so that is now for Win7 - IF the operating system is hacked in some way leaving users open to attack (eg to compromise security on eg banking sites) then MS are no longer going to attempt to fix it.
Hence - not now, not immediately - but at some point, if it's hacked (and history suggests it might very well be) Win7 users MAY render themselves an open target. And likely you may not even know it has happened, until your money (or something) is affected.
Hence the strong recommendation to update.
As is pointed out in the post #32

Personal view: Win10 is as good an OS as MS have ever made and I'm entirely happy to be a Win10 user. I do not at all understand the negativity and/or reluctance some express. Maybe I'm just lucky with my hardware and/or my choice of installed software, but I experience little in the way of problems and certainly no more than I did when I was still using 7.
W10 is no doubt a good OS and will evolve over time, but sadly it will also be attacked to probe for weaknesses. I respect users who do not want to upgrade, but let them not doing so is at their own peril. With some users it is definitely the devil you know syndrome and that's their freedom of choice.
 

deans6571

Well-known Member
...so can I also just clarify a couple of points.

Ok, so Windows 7 POTENTIALLY will not be safe going forward as support has now ended, which basically gives an open invitation to hackers, BUT, what about working inside Google Chrome in Windows 7? I know Google has stated that they will continue to support Chrome even after MS end Windows 7 support but isn't this a contradiction in terms?! Are they saying Chrome is still safe to use even though Windows 7 is now open to hackers....?!
 

hippo99

Distinguished Member
...so can I also just clarify a couple of points.

Ok, so Windows 7 POTENTIALLY will not be safe going forward as support has now ended, which basically gives an open invitation to hackers, BUT, what about working inside Google Chrome in Windows 7? I know Google has stated that they will continue to support Chrome even after MS end Windows 7 support but isn't this a contradiction in terms?! Are they saying Chrome is still safe to use even though Windows 7 is now open to hackers....?!
Imagine two scenarios:

1) Potential flaw found in W7.
Microsoft actively patching W7. Flaw is closed by updating with new W7 patch.
Weeks/months/years later, hackers find exploit using the flaw that affects Chrome.
Hackers not able to infect your W7 PC even with the Chrome exploit, as your W7 PC has already been patched.
Google closes the flaw in Chrome after a few days.

2) Potential flaw found in W7.
Microsoft NOT patching W7. Flaw is on all W7 machines.
Weeks/months/years later, hackers find exploit using the flaw that affects Chrome.
No patch on your W7 PC so your PC is infected.
Google closes the flaw in Chrome after a few days, but your W7 PC is already infected.
 

techquest

Well-known Member
...so can I also just clarify a couple of points.

Ok, so Windows 7 POTENTIALLY will not be safe going forward as support has now ended, which basically gives an open invitation to hackers, BUT, what about working inside Google Chrome in Windows 7? I know Google has stated that they will continue to support Chrome even after MS end Windows 7 support but isn't this a contradiction in terms?! Are they saying Chrome is still safe to use even though Windows 7 is now open to hackers....?!
All OS's have always been open to hackers, it's the nature of the beast to find loopholes and exploit them.

I'm not sure that any identified holes have ever been utilised to reek mayhem and such holes are usually identified by teams of dedicated people who look for such vulnerabilities. Also holes can be found by exploits in the combination of other software and the OS combined.

Most systems getting hacked is usually down to bad practices of users when surfing the net or clicking on links on rouge websites or emails. Education of users has proven to be difficult as has education of users to update and maintain the security of their systems at all times.

W7 is no longer the flagship OS and W10 is the current focus of Microsoft and where the mainstay of development and support lies, though Microsoft tend to make its major revenues through the offer of other services.

There are millions of W7 users who for whatever reason chose not to upgrade and that is their right, Their systems will run without issue provided they maintain the vigilance and practices required to keep hackers out of their system(s). However unless they are W7 enterprise users they will no longer get support for the product from Microsoft from now onward.
 

hippo99

Distinguished Member
Most systems getting hacked is usually down to bad practices of users when surfing the net or clicking on links on rouge websites or emails. Education of users has proven to be difficult as has education of users to update and maintain the security of their systems at all times.
Even an 'educated' user can sometimes fall foul of this through no fault of their own.

I think I remember quite a few years back that AVforums had something malicious embedded in one of the ads, which flagged up a 'drive-by' virus attempt on people's anti-virus software.
Have also occasionally read about similar malicious ads being on yahoo and other sites as well.
 

techquest

Well-known Member
Even an 'educated' user can sometimes fall foul of this through no fault of their own.

I think I remember quite a few years back that AVforums had something malicious embedded in one of the ads, which flagged up a 'drive-by' virus attempt on people's anti-virus software.
Have also occasionally read about similar malicious ads being on yahoo and other sites as well.
Absolutely agree with you, anyone can be caught out. I had something trying to hijack a browsing session yesterday, which I stopped intermediately and am looking at it to see how it came about. I will report it when I've investigated. It's kind of sad that you have to be on your guard 100% of the time these days, but such is life.
 

deans6571

Well-known Member
Thanks for the above responses - much appreciated (I'm a bit of a noob when it comes to stuff like this... :blush: )

I guess what I really was asking is this - is it safe for me to continue to have open tabs in my Chrome browser on my W7 machine, which would contain things like, email, social media, forums and the occasional use of online banking (I have actually closed all of these now + erased saved passwords etc - or am I perhaps being a little over dramatic?!!!

o_O
 

techquest

Well-known Member
Your safe as long as you, or other users, don't go to suspect sites or click on links in emails that are scams.

Sites that start with http: are not as safe as sites that start with htpps: for example.

I don't use chrome as a rule, they collect too much data, so look at Firefox or Opera as an alternative, both good browsers. If you don't want to be tracked then use something like DuckDuckGo, but it probably won't be good for your online banking.

DuckDuckGo — Privacy, simplified.

For online banking just make sure you are going to the site you think your going to. Check out the link detail and make sure it's https:, not http: One of the safest ways is via the banks mobile app.

Take a look at Avast Secure Browser which works in W7
Avast Secure Browser | Private browser from Avast

Your not being over dramatic, your just asking to be reassured on stuff that you're not sure of, those that don't ask usually end up paying the price. But don't get overly concerned or hung up about this.

What AV and Firewall are you using?

How do you get your emails?
 
Last edited:

deans6571

Well-known Member
What AV and Firewall are you using?

How do you get your emails?

AV is MicroSoft Security Essential for my home laptop and Firewall is the default Windows one. Laptop is quite old though so not sure it would even run W10 - more than likely I would need to upgrade the laptop itself.

Work PC: AV is ESET Endpoint. Not sure which Firewall they're using though...

Personal emails are via Gmail - work is through Outlook 2013.

I see myself as quite savvy with regards to clicking on weird links and websites, which I know not to do.
 

techquest

Well-known Member
What model is your lappy?

So put Avast AV on the laptop, or Kaspersky or Eset which are all good. Would be better to use the same across your systems.

Your emails are fine using those services provided you stick to the rules, which you say your savvy with. Just make sure others using your works system(s) are likewise savvy.
 

techquest

Well-known Member
Here's one that flashed up whilst I was doing something yesterday, using W10. Started with a quick flash of a woman in a compromising position, which got me suspicious, followed by the screenshot below. Surprised me as I was looking at stuff on another question raised by someone on the forum and hadn't gone to any suspicious sites or clicked on any links. This froze the Edge browser and couldn't do anything else in it. But being aware I closed it down with Ctrl - Alt- Delete and using Task Manager. Have passed the site link on to those who can do something about it.

1579104110349.png
 

dugn

Standard Member
Everyone above said it best. And @techquest is of amazing help and insight on these forums. I'd only add two things:

If you're using Chrome on an unsupported Operating System and wonder if Chrome will keep working fine, the answer is yes. Just like if your car was on fire but you wanted to make sure the steering wheel kept working. At some point, the OS (car) is going to be such a mess, Chrome (steering wheel) won't be worth it anymore. In the meantime, @techquest 's advice to make sure you're only connecting to secure websites is the best advice possible for continuing to use your browser.

Another angle to consider: How much personal information do you have on the Windows 7 PC? How much do you share via Chrome (banking, passwords, email addresses?). If your PC is compromised (hackers get into it), are you okay losing all of that data (all your contacts, favorite web sites) and/or having it shared on the dark web for purchase (your credit card numbers if they are typed on that old Win7 PC). Best start on a migration plan to a newer PC and/or newer OS. No rush and no panic. Just start working on a plan to get there since your Windows 7 car will eventually catch fire - whether in months of years - and you don't want to lose your data or have it shared outside of your control.

Another Chrome tip that make migrations to a new PC or OS easy. Be sure to log into Chrome with a GMail account (even if you don't have one, you can create one with your existing email address), turn on 'Sync' to get all of your passwords, favorite sites and add-ons sync'd to the Google cloud. Then when you upgrade or install a new OS and install Chrome, all you need to do is log into Chrome with that account and all of your favorites, saved passwords and all other Chrome settings will come down automatically. A big time-saver!

Good luck!



that your risk
 

deans6571

Well-known Member
Another Chrome tip that make migrations to a new PC or OS easy. Be sure to log into Chrome with a GMail account (even if you don't have one, you can create one with your existing email address), turn on 'Sync' to get all of your passwords, favorite sites and add-ons sync'd to the Google cloud. Then when you upgrade or install a new OS and install Chrome, all you need to do is log into Chrome with that account and all of your favorites, saved passwords and all other Chrome settings will come down automatically. A big time-saver!

I actually already do this but thanks also for your great advice.
:smashin:
 

techquest

Well-known Member
Everyone above said it best. And @techquest is of amazing help and insight on these forums. I'd only add two things:

If you're using Chrome on an unsupported Operating System and wonder if Chrome will keep working fine, the answer is yes. Just like if your car was on fire but you wanted to make sure the steering wheel kept working. At some point, the OS (car) is going to be such a mess, Chrome (steering wheel) won't be worth it anymore. In the meantime, @techquest 's advice to make sure you're only connecting to secure websites is the best advice possible for continuing to use your browser.

Another angle to consider: How much personal information do you have on the Windows 7 PC? How much do you share via Chrome (banking, passwords, email addresses?). If your PC is compromised (hackers get into it), are you okay losing all of that data (all your contacts, favorite web sites) and/or having it shared on the dark web for purchase (your credit card numbers if they are typed on that old Win7 PC). Best start on a migration plan to a newer PC and/or newer OS. No rush and no panic. Just start working on a plan to get there since your Windows 7 car will eventually catch fire - whether in months of years - and you don't want to lose your data or have it shared outside of your control.

Another Chrome tip that make migrations to a new PC or OS easy. Be sure to log into Chrome with a GMail account (even if you don't have one, you can create one with your existing email address), turn on 'Sync' to get all of your passwords, favorite sites and add-ons sync'd to the Google cloud. Then when you upgrade or install a new OS and install Chrome, all you need to do is log into Chrome with that account and all of your favorites, saved passwords and all other Chrome settings will come down automatically. A big time-saver!

Good luck!



that your risk
All solid advice and it's always good to have backups of all the stuff you need to keep you going forward, preferably on a drive you can take offline and all contacts etc backed up on google or outlook in the cloud so you can get at them when most needed.
 

Similar threads

The latest video from AVForums

The Best Movies and TV Shows Coming To Amazon Prime Video in August 2020. Tom's Thumbs.

Trending threads

Latest News

Linn announces Majik DSM digital streamer upgrade
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Sony announces WH-1000XM4 noise cancelling headphones
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
McIntosh launches C22 Mk V preamp and MC1502 power amplifier
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Marantz unveils 12 Series Special Edition models
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Samsung Galaxy Note 20 smart phone models launched
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Top Bottom