TV Manufacturers Failing To Deliver Previously Stated Features/Updates

PC1975

Well-known Member
*PLEASE TRY TO KEEP DISCUSSION SPECIFIC AND NOT GENERAL COMPLAINTS/OPINION*

There has been a lot of discussion over features and/or functions that TV manufacturers stated would be included at a future point when marketing tvs but have subsequently never materialised or have done so in a compromised state.

Discussion has mainly centred around issues with Samsung One Connect boxes as well as statements from Samsung/Panasonic/Sony with regard future updates/upgrades to HDR10+, HLG and Dolby Vision. It would be of great benefit if anyone can detail any statements that were made - dates & content. Links and screenshots would also help.

It would also help if anyone can offer sound practical advice as how to go about challenging retailers/manufacturers on this as well as detailing any accounts of doing so and the outcome.
 
Last edited:

Phil Hinton

Editor
Staff member
Manufacturers will always cover themselves legally in any official paperwork, adverts or so on by stating specifications may change at any time. It would be very difficult to prove a case of buying an item and then being annoyed at a later date that it didn't get the update promised.

AVForums advice has always been that you should only buy a product that has everything you want at the time of purchase. Never buy an item expecting it to be updated later down the line as this will likely end in disappointment and the manufacturers will have covered themselves legally.

In the case of items that are sold as upgradable, make sure you read the small print on the T&C's as again it will likely have a disclaimer covering the retailer.

The current systems in place are not fair on unsuspecting consumers and shines a rather poor light on certain manufacturers who have not come through on items, and consumer pressure and speaking with your wallets is probably the only way to push a new agenda. Obviously a platform such as AVForums is a place to highlight issues and discuss these. We certainly try to push members questions and issues from the editorial side.
 

kinggo

Member
AVForums advice has always been that you should only buy a product that has everything you want at the time of purchase. Never buy an item expecting it to be updated later down the line as this will likely end in disappointment and the manufacturers will have covered themselves legally.
well, common sense should be enough for that. But anyway, my issues with almost averything today that is SW upgreadable is that often even the features that are there don't work as they should and that often stays like that till the EOL.
 

PC1975

Well-known Member
@Phil Hinton

Good post Phil but it's also worth noting that just because something is included in t&cs doesn't necessarily guarantee it to be upheld legally if challenged.
 

Har-One

Member
AVForums advice has always been that you should only buy a product that has everything you want at the time of purchase. Never buy an item expecting it to be updated later down the line as this will likely end in disappointment and the manufacturers will have covered themselves legally.
Deadly right, we should buy only the toys that we are happy for what they do not for what it might happen in the future. We keep reading about future-proof technology. It does not exist. No technology can be forward-compatible.

Manufacturers are only interested in our money not us. It may sound cynical but good or bad customer service is present in every single one of them. They will always cover their behinds with some legal mumbo-jumbo.
 

Nativebon

Well-known Member
OK I get what you all saying about them covering themselves. Why does the media not pick up on the TV industry like it does on cars, eg. Volkswagen, Samsung phones, IPhone battery washing machines etc.

For some strange reason the TV industry is not flagged up like others in mainstream news when their service becomes sub standard.
This is one area were TV manufacturers are save.

How does this work and why?
 

PC1975

Well-known Member
OK I get what you all saying about them covering themselves. Why does the media not pick up on the TV industry like it does on cars, eg. Volkswagen, Samsung phones, IPhone battery washing machines etc.

For some strange reason the TV industry is not flagged up like others in mainstream news when their service becomes sub standard.
This is one area were TV manufacturers are save.

How does this work and why?
Well tvs still function perfectly well without upgrades so it's not quite on the same level but that doesn't mean failing to deliver on previous announcements shouldn't come under scrutiny. Bringing something to public attention often comes down to consumers themselves taking legal action.

What would be useful would be for anyone with a gripe to specifically detail exactly what they are unhappy with.
 

Joe Pineapples

Distinguished Member
Manufacturers will always cover themselves legally in any official paperwork, adverts or so on by stating specifications may change at any time. It would be very difficult to prove a case of buying an item and then being annoyed at a later date that it didn't get the update promised.

AVForums advice has always been that you should only buy a product that has everything you want at the time of purchase..
Even then, don't always assume what you buy at the time, to stay the same throughout the tv's life. Case in point, bought a Samsung tv back in 2014, partly because it included the Vimeo app. Last year (or maybe 2016) said app was removed by Samsung. Annoying but nothing I could do about it.
 

dannyjbee

Standard Member
Right The first time for me was with Samsung with the promise of the one connect box stated at the time (2015) upgradable 3-5 years. We here in australia got 1 upgrade then they stopped altogether while our friends in the usa got 2 upgrades then ceased. Moved to Sony liked the tv and with the promise of Dolby Vision as well great. Now it looks like back in the same boat, it just gives me the sh*ts that these company's can get away with this crap and nothing is done about it.
 

Khazul

Well-known Member
The problem you always face is that even among people who buy high end AV equipment those who really care about feature detail are still probably quite small, and thus you don't get millions of people complaining to watch dog about being shafted by Samsung or Sony. You maybe get 10 instead which isn't enough noise for it to become an issue for anyone. You choose to vote with your wallet next time - great you have just changed their sales figures by 0.0001% at best. Noon is going to even notice or care.

Look how long it has taken to start to thinking about curbing the extent of the outright lies that broadband companies tell people.

We quite simply have no meaningful legal remedy whatsoever. Perhaps if promised features were truly part of a sales contract and the allowance for we may change specification without notice was made illegal, then maybe randomly ditching something wouldn't be the usual way out. I really do not see that happening.
Law becomes completely pointless when it can be bypassed with a simple catch all disclaimer that you are deemed to have accepted the moment you try to use something regardless of whether you are aware or not.
 

Nativebon

Well-known Member
The problem you always face is that even among people who buy high end AV equipment those who really care about feature detail are still probably quite small, and thus you don't get millions of people complaining to watch dog about being shafted by Samsung or Sony. You maybe get 10 instead which isn't enough noise for it to become an issue for anyone. You choose to vote with your wallet next time - great you have just changed their sales figures by 0.0001% at best. Noon is going to even notice or care.

Look how long it has taken to start to thinking about curbing the extent of the outright lies that broadband companies tell people.

We quite simply have no meaningful legal remedy whatsoever. Perhaps if promised features were truly part of a sales contract and the allowance for we may change specification without notice was made illegal, then maybe randomly ditching something wouldn't be the usual way out. I really do not see that happening.
Law becomes completely pointless when it can be bypassed with a simple catch all disclaimer that you are deemed to have accepted the moment you try to use something regardless of whether you are aware or not.
You hit the nail on the head. I strongly believe the time will come for TV companies to seat up. If they continue this way, sooner or later they will run out of luck.
 

PC1975

Well-known Member
In complete agreement about all encompassing get out of jail disclaimers. If they market a product on the basis of having specific features added at a later date any such disclaimer should be rendered invalid. Otherwise what's the point of having laws against mis-selling.

It would be very interesting if someone took a retailer or manufacturer to court over it but I would guess that the threat to do so or to undertake initial proceedings would probably be enough to get them to wheel out the old 'we will replace it as a gesture of goodwill' excuse while refusing to accept fault.
 

choddo

Well-known Member
Deadly right, we should buy only the toys that we are happy for what they do not for what it might happen in the future. We keep reading about future-proof technology. It does not exist. No technology can be forward-compatible.

Manufacturers are only interested in our money not us. It may sound cynical but good or bad customer service is present in every single one of them. They will always cover their behinds with some legal mumbo-jumbo.
I don’t agree with that. Customer experience is very high on almost every company’s priorities in a world where bad news spreads very quickly. Of course, that has to be balanced against cost.
 

choddo

Well-known Member
In complete agreement about all encompassing get out of jail disclaimers. If they market a product on the basis of having specific features added at a later date any such disclaimer should be rendered invalid. Otherwise what's the point of having laws against mis-selling.
This is an interesting area as everything becomes uogradeable over the Internet. I work for a software company and we’re not allowed to promise future features. If we do, we aren’t allowed to recognise revenue from that transaction until they are delivered. Maybe the same accounting rules don’t apply if you are selling a physical object.
 

Har-One

Member
I don’t agree with that. Customer experience is very high on almost every company’s priorities in a world where bad news spreads very quickly. Of course, that has to be balanced against cost.
You do not have to agree. That might well be your experience but not mine. IMO the customer experience depends more on who you talk to at the moment that the company in question.

Samsung's Note 3 and later disable Wifi chip whilst visiting the wrong countries. I tried Samsung's support to tell me if this was still the case with the Note 8. I have not got a single word about it. I do not think that it should be too expensive to find that information. I bought a Sony TV from a Sony Centre which went out of business. I was left with a faulty brand new TV with 5 years warranty and Sony did everything in their power not to help. They even stop my local authorized repair centre from given me information about it. Panasonic did f... all when I had a problem with a BR player. Even JL and Waitrose notorious for their good customer service have horror stories. The list is enormous, Air France, Virgin Media, Krups. If we open a thread about good and bad customer services almost every if not every company will be in both lists.

If the device has any fault that I cannot live with it or does not have a feature that I want at the time of purchase I will not buy it or return it to get my money back. A fault in a brand new device usually translate in endless fixing visits and the problem rarely gets solved.
 

Nativebon

Well-known Member
Boy!! where do I start with bad customer service. What always works for me is small claims court. Immediately you put that in the manager that was never available calls you as soon as they get the paper work. Very easy to do online. I wish more people get to do it.
 

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