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What is Contrast Modulation?

Abacus

Well-known Member
Amazing, I was just watching a You Tube video about this only yesterday and shortly after I finished watching up pops an article on AVForums. (Wonder if AVForums is practising mind control techniques :D)
As far as I could see it was the technology used that made the biggest difference, (LCD or OLED) and in the real world it is this that can make a 4K TV look as good as an 8K TV, rather than the resolution itself. (As 8K technology improves it will be interesting to see if this changes the ball park)

Thanks for the write up.

Bill
 

jdcosta283

Novice Member
amazing, contrast modulation is part of the ability of the display. The display facebook can release a higher percentage of line text will appear and clear the image.
 

Livemo

Active Member
 

Livemo

Active Member
The rgbw structure in their lcds is different to the wrgb in their oleds. The former is inferior to the typical rgb structure in lcds.
its bizarre to say the least. Even hdtvtest asked about this approach and Couldn't get any answers. With poor performance and mot mention using ips.
 

mircea

Active Member
its bizarre to say the least. Even hdtvtest asked about this approach and Couldn't get any answers. With poor performance and mot mention using ips.
No, link
,,Samsung initially chose not to respond to LG’s claims, but later reversed its stance and tried to counter those criticisms. But it wasn’t done any favors when the Consumer Technology Association suddenly announced in September that it had finalised its list of specifications for TV makers who wish to display its 8K logo on their products. The CTA’s specs require that displays “meet a minimum of 50% contrast modulation using a 1x1 grill pattern”, which seems to rule out all of Samsung’s 8K TVs, but not LG’s."

And everybody knows what Razer08 sayed, that rgbw structure in LG lcds is different to the wrgb in their oleds link
,,RGBW
With a RGBW screen, each row of 3 colored pixels is alternated with a white pixel. This means that 25% of the screen is made up of color, but of white light. If you exclude all of these white pixels, the television actually has a resolution of 2,880 by 2,160 pixels. This results in a less realistic color representation and less sharp screen, compared to an RGB television.

WRGB
An OLED screen features its own pixel structure, called WRGB. Instead of utilizing rows of different pixels, like RGBW, each pixel is identical. These pixels can independently produce color and white light. This is possible because each pixel consists of red, green, blue, and white sub pixels stacked on top of each other. With help of a filter, only the desired colors are shown. This technology helps ensure an extra accurate color representation."
 

Livemo

Active Member
No, link
,,Samsung initially chose not to respond to LG’s claims, but later reversed its stance and tried to counter those criticisms. But it wasn’t done any favors when the Consumer Technology Association suddenly announced in September that it had finalised its list of specifications for TV makers who wish to display its 8K logo on their products. The CTA’s specs require that displays “meet a minimum of 50% contrast modulation using a 1x1 grill pattern”, which seems to rule out all of Samsung’s 8K TVs, but not LG’s."

And everybody knows what Razer08 sayed, that rgbw structure in LG lcds is different to the wrgb in their oleds link
,,RGBW
With a RGBW screen, each row of 3 colored pixels is alternated with a white pixel. This means that 25% of the screen is made up of color, but of white light. If you exclude all of these white pixels, the television actually has a resolution of 2,880 by 2,160 pixels. This results in a less realistic color representation and less sharp screen, compared to an RGB television.

WRGB
An OLED screen features its own pixel structure, called WRGB. Instead of utilizing rows of different pixels, like RGBW, each pixel is identical. These pixels can independently produce color and white light. This is possible because each pixel consists of red, green, blue, and white sub pixels stacked on top of each other. With help of a filter, only the desired colors are shown. This technology helps ensure an extra accurate color representation."
I'm not arguing why samsung isn't responding to lg claims about contrast modulation value. The problem is with white oled it cheats brightness and the colour purity isn't as good true rgb oled, hence why samsung would never touch one.

 

mircea

Active Member
I'm not arguing why samsung isn't responding to lg claims about contrast modulation value. The problem is with white oled it cheats brightness and the colour purity isn't as good true rgb oled, hence why samsung would never touch one.

There is zero relation between LG LCD and LG OLED, except... it's producer. LG Oled structure doesn't cheat brightness, nor color and definitely has 100% real 4k resolution.
Of course true RGB OLED has better color volume/gamut but is also more expensive and more prone to aging.
Samsung will not produce true RGB OLED, but QD-OLED or blue emitter with filters link
In making a “good” blue OLED, it is possible that Samsung will require a next-generation blue OLED emitter material such as phosphorescent or TADF, but our sources say that Samsung will start with a fluorescent blue emitter and use two emitting layers as shown.
 

Livemo

Active Member
There is zero relation between LG LCD and LG OLED, except... it's producer. LG Oled structure doesn't cheat brightness, nor color and definitely has 100% real 4k resolution.
Of course true RGB OLED has better color volume/gamut but is also more expensive and more prone to aging.
Samsung will not produce true RGB OLED, but QD-OLED or blue emitter with filters link
In making a “good” blue OLED, it is possible that Samsung will require a next-generation blue OLED emitter material such as phosphorescent or TADF, but our sources say that Samsung will start with a fluorescent blue emitter and use two emitting layers as shown.
Adding more brightness is fine, but you are losing colour information. Current oled blues can only hit about 400nis, next gen materials will be more effective. Anything above that that's when the white will be kicks in. If you see Vincent review of the zg2000 he mentions the colours look more dilute at higher brightness levels. You have seen how bad the screen uniformity has been in these sets. As for lg nanocell tvs, trying to get a review is hard enough, speaks for its self, let alone panel structure.
 
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Steve Withers

Reviewer
I do think LG has a bit of a cheek when you consider its two 8K TVs can't internally decode any of the current 8K codecs. They can accept 8K video via HDMI 2.1, but as far as I'm aware there aren't any 8K HDMI sources. So essentially that means LG's models are 4K TVs with an 8K panel!
 

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