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When are we going to see 8k movie releases

filmofil

Active Member
I know that many 35mm recorded movies even from 70s and 80s have ability to be transfered into 8k and that many movies today are shot in 5 and 6k abilities, but when are we going to see release, any in 2020, or maybe 2021? I bet in 2 years, there will be a lot os 8k users, so far i know handful of 8k tv owners and im planing to buy one this summer.

Will there be 8k movies in next year or so, remaster or any digital news ones?
 

hippo99

Distinguished Member
I know that many 35mm recorded movies even from 70s and 80s have ability to be transfered into 8k and that many movies today are shot in 5 and 6k
35mm film has a digital resolution equivalent to ~4K, 35mm Imax film equates to ~6K, 70mm Imax is closer to ~12K.
Most modern films are finished using a 2K DI, and a few using a 4K DI.
 

filmofil

Active Member
Hm, i did read that and i still dont know why do we need to wait up to 2023 to get movies on it? I mean, if mobile phone such as S11 soon to be released have ability to capture 8k and upcoming gopro as well above 5k, and many camers for consumers already offers up to 8k, why would they still use 2K DI and 4K DI in Cinema universe? Are they so behind with movie camers that they dont use Imax cameras to put out 8k content already? I mean 3 years is really a long time to go.
 

mark6226

Well-known Member
The peculiar thing is that celluloid has a native resolution above 8k. Not bad for a format over 100 years old
therefore. All celluloid movies released on 8k will be downscales.
as they are on bluray and 4k bluray.
digitally shot movies have a much lower native resolution than celluloid. And look much worse until hdr is injected.
 

captainarchive

Distinguished Member
The peculiar thing is that celluloid has a native resolution above 8k. Not bad for a format over 100 years old
therefore. All celluloid movies released on 8k will be downscales.
as they are on bluray and 4k bluray.
digitally shot movies have a much lower native resolution than celluloid. And look much worse until hdr is injected.
I always thought celluloid was in the region of '20K'.
 

Over by there

Well-known Member
whatever DI aside (there are plenty of 4K ones now), would a 8K fit on a single disk at the moment. New codec coming out might remedy that but I see it more as a streaming thing now rather than a hard copy.
2001 was scanned in at 8K and the 4k release was made from that as I understand it. NHK transmitted the 8k version on its 8k channel debut. That was over the bird.
Perhaps the issue is not can we, it is can we store it.
 

Captain Ron

Well-known Member
Happily stopping at 4K. What resolution is your local cinema? Do you ever complain about the lack of resolution when you look at that screen? What size can your home display be? Can you make it big enough to distinguish the difference between 4K and 8K? 8K resolution for home cinema is just silly imho.
 

gadget man

Active Member
35mm film has a digital resolution equivalent to ~4K, 35mm Imax film equates to ~6K, 70mm Imax is closer to ~12K.
Most modern films are finished using a 2K DI, and a few using a 4K DI.
35mm film has a digital resolution equivalent to ~4K

Really who told you this?
sorry but you are way off
 

hippo99

Distinguished Member
It's wrong do not believe everything on internet. Chris nolan,speilberg,tarratino all use 35mm simply because better quality. Also why would they bother scanning several movies at 8K eg wizard of oz, arabia and i believe 2001
Both Laurence of Arabia and 2001 were filmed on 65mm so I can absolutely see the benefit of scanning those at 8k.
With Wizard of Oz, an 8K scan will probably pick up a bit more detail than a 4K scan but I would bet that the law of diminishing returns would come into play and there wouldn't be that much of noticeable difference between the two.
 

televisionuser

Active Member
So with 4k I need to be a few feet away from the TV which is 55 inches to notice a difference which means that 8k will have to cover a whole wall.
It would be much more exciting to see new displays with much higher refresh rates and better motion resolution using strobing and other techniques.
8k is obviously unnecessary and just a marketing gimmick. Everyone knows that a BLURAY still looks better than 4k streaming.
 

Tom Davies

Editorial Contributor
So with 4k I need to be a few feet away from the TV which is 55 inches to notice a difference which means that 8k will have to cover a whole wall.
It would be much more exciting to see new displays with much higher refresh rates and better motion resolution using strobing and other techniques.
8k is obviously unnecessary and just a marketing gimmick. Everyone knows that a BLURAY still looks better than 4k streaming.
Unless you're considering getting a 100" TV and sitting 4 feet away from it, you will never need an 8k TV.
And if you are considering that...seek help.
 

Otto Chriek

Standard Member
The resolution of 35mm movie film is nowhere near 8K. If you try to scan even the negative much beyond 3K you will only be zooming into the film grain. Some directors like to use film but they choose it for its colourimetry and dynamic range not for its resolution.

A few years ago a professional video website (sorry it was a long time ago so I can't remember which) reported on an experiment to measure "cinema" quality using test charts which were filmed and processed in the same way as a cinema show print. They measured the resolution of the projected charts at 1500 lines, roughly 2.5K. This is in line with the practice of creating digital intermediates at 2K as pointed out elsewhere in this thread.

I personally believe that 8K is an unwelcome distraction. It may have some niche advantages in video production but It will be years if ever until native content is delivered to the consumer in any meaningful way (and yes I know about the Japanese channel).

Even if broadcasts or streams do begin in the future the gains over 4K are likely to be so tiny as to be utterly pointless and a complete waste of bandwidth.
 

Misty

Novice Member
Happily stopping at 4K. What resolution is your local cinema? Do you ever complain about the lack of resolution when you look at that screen? What size can your home display be? Can you make it big enough to distinguish the difference between 4K and 8K? 8K resolution for home cinema is just silly imho.
Totally agree, unless you're projecting onto a large screen you wont get any discernible uplift from 4K to 8K other than better colour reproduction but that's pushing it. I am one of the worse offenders for early adopting but I wont be changing my TV for quite a while but am toying with adding a VAVA 4K or OPTOMA P1 as a fun BIG screen companion device.
 

Captain Ron

Well-known Member
There is one really good thing about the push to 8K by the manufacturers. The HDMI org have come up with a new certification for HDMI 2.1 cables. Buying those for key connections in a 4K system should absolutely completely utterly guarantee that your cables are up to the job for 4K. :D
 

Robothamster

Distinguished Member

Over by there

Well-known Member
More than happy with the uplift if it can translate through the system. Depends on the backhaul, link to the home (forget a hard copy), storage at servers and compression. VVC due out this year, could have a lot to do with ir.
 

mark6226

Well-known Member
Celluloid has a native resolution above 8k. I belive that a 70mm film is around 12k.Not bad for a technology over 100 years old.
8k movies won't be getting released anyway on a physical format. After the commercial failure of 4k blu-ray why would the industry want to try again with yet another format?
I watched to kill a mocking bird on bluray the other night and I'm now watching the third man
These movies are truly incredible
If they were at 4k, 8k or 12k would they be any better?
Sublime movies don't need hi res to sell them. They sell themselves.
It's only the pulp that needs a gimmick to make them worthwhile.
And then you still have sit so close to the screen to see the difference that the brightness makes your head and eyes hurt. So we it further back. And 8k Becomes 1080p.
If people need a gimmick to make the movie worthwhile then they aren't watching for the right reasons. Sadly, many need a gimmick. We've seen on here people moaning that planet earth 4k Doesn't have atmos etc. The series is stunning. Yet people can't watch without the gimmick.
it's kind of sad. A symptom of the age.
 
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